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The giving world - The three financial forces that could transform global development - cover

The giving world - The three financial forces that could transform global development

Mona Hammami Hijazi

Publisher: Infinite Ideas

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Summary

Three forms of development finance – aid, remittances, and philanthropy – have the potential to transform the developing world. Individually and collectively these three flows of money represent an enormous transfer of wealth. Maximizing them has the power to change the world for the better.
This is not hyperbole. In one year donors provided $135 billion in net official development assistance; an estimated $583 billion remittances were transferred globally; and in the US alone some $358 billion was given to charities through philanthropy. Used wisely, these relatively untapped elements have the power to change the world. Moreover, these three sources of finance are rarely, if ever, considered together. Until now.
The giving world examines each of the three financial forces in light of important shifts taking place, and provides a roadmap to make them a more effective means of distributing much-needed money and resources, and achieving vital goals.

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