Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Tartuffe - cover

Tartuffe

Molière Molière

Publisher: E-BOOKARAMA

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Among Molière's best-known works is "Tartuffe" (AKA "The Hypocrite"), written in 1664. Though "Tartuffe" was received well by the public and even by Louis XIV, its popularity was lessened when the Archbishop of Paris issued an edict lasting 5 years threatening excommunication for anyone who watched, performed in, or read the play.
Molière's masterpiece 'Tartuffe'' is a story about a man who falls prey to misplaced adoration. The dramatic work presents several dramatic features which define the play as a comedy of manners. Of particular importance is Molière's satirical look at religious hypocrisy. 

Tartuffe, a pious fraud who pretends to speak with divine authority, has insinuated himself into the household of Orgon. When Orgon announces that his daughter Mariane is to marry Tartuffe instead of her fiance Valère, the rest of the family realizes the extent of Tartuffe's influence over Orgon. Tartuffe tries to seduce Orgon's wife Elmire, who traps him into revealing to Orgon his intentions toward her. Orgon throws Tartuffe out of the house, Tartuffe returns with an order of eviction for the family, and at the final moment the tables are turned and the play ends happily.
Available since: 10/14/2019.

Other books that might interest you

  • Otter - cover

    Otter

    Ben Ladouceur

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    His body, like yours, would liemute as a plumuntil a vigilant limb cameto a decision. As you might have guessedI've come to one myself.
     
    Moving from the absurdity of the First World War to the chaos of today’s cities, where men share beds, bottles of ouzo and shade from willow trees, these poems ask questions: If your lover speaks in his sleep, how do you know 'you' is you? What good is it to decorate a headstone? What if you think of the perfect comeback to a six-year-­old argument? Otter fails, with style, to find answers.
     
    'Ladouceur writes with an awareness of queer history, documenting it faithfully, but with his own twist … This is poetry motivated by an honest wit.'-- John Barton, Arc Poetry Magazine
    Show book
  • Venus & Adonis - cover

    Venus & Adonis

    William Shakespeare

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    These two great poems date from Shakespeare’s early years and are full of passion and invention. In Venus and Adonis, the goddess of love pleads with the beautiful boy to submit to her advances and become her love – but he only wants to hunt boar. In the more serious Rape of Lucrece, Shakespeare draws on the Roman take of the Emperor Tarquin’s desire for Lucrece and its tragic consequencies. These poems give prominent parts to the two heroines, and Clare Corbett and Eve Best shine.
    Show book
  • Gallipoli Diary - cover

    Gallipoli Diary

    John Graham Gillam

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Major John Graham Gillam, British Supply Officer, wrote in his World War I Gallipoli Diary that when he sailed from England for the Dardanelles in March, 1915, he had visions of “trekking up the Gallipoli Peninsula with the Navy bombarding a way for us up the Straits and along the coast-line of the Sea of Marmora, until after a brief campaign we entered triumphantly Constantinople, there to meet the Russian Army, which would link up with ourselves to form part of a great chain encircling and throttling the Central Empires. . . We little appreciated the difficulties of the task,” he continues, in potent understatement. 
     
    Gillam’s charge was shepherding supplies--food and munitions--from beach depots to the trenches for a brigade of 4000 men.  Since it was his first experience with “real war,” he decided to keep a diary, which he did from the day he landed at Gallipoli (April 25, 1915) until he was evacuated at the end of the campaign in January 1916.  He aptly states in the preface to the published version of his diary: “those who desire to survey the whole amazing Gallipoli campaign in perspective must look elsewhere than in these pages. Their sole object was to record the personal impressions, feeling, and doings from day to day of one supply officer to a Division whose gallantry in that campaign well earned for it the epithet “Immortal.”As the campaign intensifies, Gillam’s entries mature.  Early on (May 30), a sample entry: “This afternoon I ride . . . to Morto Bay, and on the way have a delightful cross-country canter.  I have difficulty, though, in making my mare jump trenches.  She jumped hurdles at Warwick race-course like a bird.”  A month later, on June 30, “The smell of dead bodies is at times almost unbearable in the trenches, and chloride of lime is thrown over them.  I know of no more sickly smell than chloride of lime with the smell of a dead body blended in.” Another month, and respect for the Turks, and also for the rugged terrain of the peninsula is evident (August 29): “Behind me, purple Turkish hills, every point of which is held by the enemy.  Then in between our line and the hills the scrubby low-lying country. . .  I look at it hopelessly--for I know now, as we all do, that the conquest of the Peninsula is more than we can hope for.  All that is left to us is to hang on day by day. . .  Death in various forms walks with us always . . .”Today, the Turkish Government maintains a war memorial and cemeteries at the Gallipoli Peninsula Historical National Park.  Memories are very much alive there.  Preserved trenches and the sad graves of many, many soldiers from both sides of the conflict are made especially poignant by the beauty of the setting-- the sea and high hills beyond.(Summary by Sue Anderson)
    Show book
  • Henry VI Pt1 (Argo Classics) - cover

    Henry VI Pt1 (Argo Classics)

    William Shakespeare

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    William Collins Books and Decca Records are proud to present ARGO Classics, a historic catalogue of classic prose and verse read by some of the world’s most renowned voices. Originally released as vinyl records, these expertly remastered stories are now available to download for the first time. 
    ‘No, no, I am but shadow of myself: 
    You are deceived, my substance is not here.’ 
    Henry VI Part I is part of Shakespeare’s trilogy centred on the Wars of the Roses. 
    After Henry V's death and while Henry VI is young, nobles rule England and fight the French, including Joan of Arc. As Henry VI becomes King, the noble houses begin to divide and take sides between York and Lancaster. The war with France winds down, and the nobles try to find Henry a wife and disagree about who Henry chooses. 
    All of the Shakespeare plays within the ARGO Classics catalogue are performed by the Marlowe Dramatic Society and Professional Players. The Marlowe was founded in 1907 with a mission to focus on effective delivery of verse, respect the integrity of texts, and rescue neglected plays by Shakespeare’s contemporaries and the less performed plays of Shakespeare himself. The Marlowe has performed annually at Cambridge Arts Theatre since its opening in 1936 and continues to produce some of the finest actors of their generations. 
    Thurston Dart, Professor of Music at London University and a Fellow of Jesus College Cambridge, directed the music for this production. 
    The full cast includes: Richard Marquand; David King; Carleton Hobbs; Terrence Hardiman; Denis McCarthy; Roger Croucher; Peter Orr; Frank Duncan; John Tydeman; Gary Watson; William Devlin; Gordon Gardner; Cyril Luckham; John Nettleton; John Shrapnel; Raymond Clark; Brian Batchelor; David Rowe-Beddoe; Anthony Arlidge; Bob Jones; Patrick Garland; Clinton Baddele; John Hopkins; John Tracy-Phillips; David Buck; John Bartom; Ronald Grey; Mary Morris; Yvonne Bonnamy; Freda Dowie.
    Show book
  • A Poem A Day: Autumn - A Season in Verse - Poems to make your day - cover

    A Poem A Day: Autumn - A Season...

    Robert Louis Stevenson,...

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A time for harvest.  The rich bounty of grain and fruit given by Nature ensures she has prepared everyone for the coming rigors.  One last splash of rich, mature colour as everything ripens; colours of glory and then the slow release of her yearly mantle.  
     
    Here, each and every day is celebrated with distinct and separate verse; Some poems commemorate the day it was written, others the birth or death of the writer or a particular significant moment that engages poet with date and verse.   
     
    Our classic poets have much to say in myriad ways….
    Show book
  • Henry V - cover

    Henry V

    William Shakespeare

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    After the turmoil and uncertainty of Henry IV a new era appears to dawn for England with the accession of the eponymous Henry V. In this sunny pageant Chorus guides us along Henry's glittering carpet ride of success as the new king completes his transformation from rebellious wastrel to a truly regal potentate. Of course, there is an underlying feeling that the good times won't last, and this is all the more reason to enjoy the Indian summer before the protracted and bitter fall of the house of Lancaster.
    Show book