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Italian Short Stories for Beginners - English Italian - 50 Dialogues with bilingual reading and 50 amazing Penguins images to Learn Italian for Beginners - cover

Italian Short Stories for Beginners - English Italian - 50 Dialogues with bilingual reading and 50 amazing Penguins images to Learn Italian for Beginners

Mobile Library

Publisher: Mobile Library

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Summary

I will go home now = Andrò a casa.
Do you understand these first Italian words? Yes, you do!

How?
Because you read it using a new technique: bilingual reading (parallel text).

How it works?
It's simple: bilingual reading works by reading two versions of the same book or text at the same time.

One version is in the language you want to learn (here you will learn Italian words) and the other version is in your native language or in another language that you feel comfortable with: here we will use English.

This way, you can use short stories to learn Italian the fun way with the bilingual reading natural method.

Using this method, you will quickly start to learn Italian from basics and learn Italian fast by accumulating vocabulary.

In order to make simple the Italian language study, this book brings together 50 amazing Penguins images with short, simple, funny texts written in their native language and with Italian key words.

The simple Italian short stories for beginners and dialogues in this Italian dual language book a great tool to learn Italian for beginners of all ages. 

Let's start learning Italian?
Come on, it's going to be fun - the Penguins will help you learn!

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