As many books as you want!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Rayleigh The Postcard Collection - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 1 million other books to choose from, so you can read without limits!

Rayleigh The Postcard Collection

Mike Davies & Sharon Davies

Publisher: Amberley Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Rayleigh is a picturesque market town and civil parish in the District of Rochford in Essex, England, located between Chelmsford and Southend-on-Sea. It lies to the east of central London and had a population of 30,196 in 2001, having expanded rapidly in the 1960s. Over the years many postcard makers have made Rayleigh their focus, capturing the huge changes that have occurred over the last century. In Rayleigh: The Postcard Collection, local historians Mike & Sharon Davies take readers on a tour through the town's history, illustrated with over 150 postcards from the last century.

Other books that might interest you

  • Jung contra Freud - The 1912 New York Lectures on the Theory of Psychoanalysis - cover

    Jung contra Freud - The 1912 New...

    C. G. Jung

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    In the autumn of 1912, C. G. Jung, then president of the International Psychoanalytic Association, set out his critique and reformulation of the theory of psychoanalysis in a series of lectures in New York, ideas that were to prove unacceptable to Freud, thus creating a schism in the Freudian school. Jung challenged Freud's understandings of sexuality, the origins of neuroses, dream interpretation, and the unconscious, and Jung also became the first to argue that every analyst should themselves be analyzed. Seen in the light of the subsequent reception and development of psychoanalysis, Jung's critiques appear to be strikingly prescient, while also laying the basis for his own school of analytical psychology. 
     This volume of Jung's lectures includes an introduction by Sonu Shamdasani, Philemon Professor of Jung History at University College London, and editor of Jung's Red Book.
    Show book
  • The Global Bourgeoisie - The Rise of the Middle Classes in the Age of Empire - cover

    The Global Bourgeoisie - The...

    Jürgen Osterhammel, David...

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The first global history of the middle class  
    While the nineteenth century has been described as the golden age of the European bourgeoisie, the emergence of the middle class and bourgeois culture was by no means exclusive to Europe. The Global Bourgeoisie explores the rise of the middle classes around the world during the age of empire. Bringing together eminent scholars, this landmark essay collection compares middle-class formation in various regions, highlighting differences and similarities, and assesses the extent to which bourgeois growth was tied to the increasing exchange of ideas and goods. The contributors indicate that the middle class was from its very beginning, even in Europe, the result of international connections and entanglements. 
    Essays are grouped into six thematic sections: the political history of middle-class formation, the impact of imperial rule on the colonial middle class, the role of capitalism, the influence of religion, the obstacles to the middle class beyond the Western and colonial world, and, lastly, reflections on the creation of bourgeois cultures and global social history. Placing the establishment of middle-class society into historical context, this book shows how the triumph or destabilization of bourgeois values can shape the liberal world order. 
    The Global Bourgeoisie irrevocably changes the understanding of how an important social class came to be.
    Show book
  • Deeper Than Indigo - Tracing Thomas Machell Forgotten Explorer - cover

    Deeper Than Indigo - Tracing...

    Jenny Balfour Paul

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    After discovering the diaries of Victorian explorer Thomas Machell in the dusty recesses of the British Library, Jenny set out on her own voyage, tracing his footsteps across oceans and continents for ten years, on a quest to discover and understand this extraordinary character. In 2010 she travelled alone to India on the last cargo ship to accept passengers. The journey was as treacherous as it had been in Thomas's day and Jenny was advised to hide below deck and sleep with a knife by her bed and dollars sewn into her jacket. She narrowly escaped attack as naval ships intercepted a pirate 'mothership' spotted off the Yemeni coast. Jenny's journey ends as she finally discovers Thomas's overgrown grave when travelling with herdaughter after over 15 years of searching. Through a combination of the author's own memoirs, sketches and recollections of travels, entwined with Thomas Machell's tales and intricate drawings, Deeper than Indigo offers a unique insight into the social history of British colonialism at its height, from the East India Company to the Raj, while telling the story of a forgotten pioneer, whose startling diaries shed a surprisingly progressive light on European colonialism.
    Show book
  • Aspects of the Feminine - (From Volumes 6 7 9i 9ii 10 17 Collected Works) - cover

    Aspects of the Feminine - (From...

    C. G. Jung

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Extracted from Volumes 6, 7, 9, Parts I and II, 10 and 17. This collection offers a range of articles and extracts from Jung's writings on marriage, Eros, the mother, the maiden, and the anima/animus concept. In the absence of any single formal statement by Jung on the psychology of women, this work conveys his views on the feminine and on topics that are intrinsic or related.
    Show book
  • Arts and Minds - How the Royal Society of Arts Changed a Nation - cover

    Arts and Minds - How the Royal...

    Anton Howes

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A major new history of the extraordinary society that has touched all aspects of British life 
    From its beginnings in a coffee house in the mid-eighteenth century, the Royal Society for the Encouragement of Arts, Manufactures and Commerce has tried to improve British life in every way imaginable. It has sought to influence how Britons work, how they are educated, the music they listen to, the food they eat, the items in their homes, and even how they remember their own history. Arts and Minds is the remarkable story of an institution unlike any other—a society for the improvement of everything and anything. 
    Drawing on exclusive access to a wealth of rare papers and artefacts from the Society's own archives, Anton Howes shows how this vibrant and singularly ambitious organisation has evolved and adapted, constantly having to reinvent itself to keep in step with changing times. The Society has served as a platform for Victorian utilitarian reformers, purchased and restored an entire village, encouraged the planting of more than sixty million trees, and sought technological alternatives to child labour. But this is more than just a story about unusual public initiatives. It is an engaging and authoritative history of almost three centuries of social reform and competing visions of a better world—the Society's members have been drawn from across the political spectrum, including Adam Smith, Edmund Burke, and Karl Marx. 
    Informative and entertaining, Arts and Minds reveals how a society of public-spirited individuals tried to make their country a better place, and draws vital lessons from their triumphs and failures for all would-be reformers today.
    Show book
  • That Was When People Started to Worry - Windows into Unwell Minds - cover

    That Was When People Started to...

    Nancy Tucker

    • 2
    • 12
    • 0
    'This is mental illness. It is unexpected strength and unusual luck and an uninterrupted string of steps. Then the next wave comes. And while you wipe grit from your eyes and swipe blood from your knees, the smiling faces in the distance call out: Why do you keep falling over?! Just stand up!'
    
    
    Conversations about mental health are increasing, but we still seldom hear what it's really like to suffer from mental illness.
    
    
    Enter Nancy Tucker, author of the acclaimed eating disorder memoir, The Time In Between. Based on her interviews with young women aged 16–25, That Was When People Started to Worry weaves together experiences of mental illness into moving narratives, humorous anecdotes, and guidance as to how we can all be more empathetic towards those who suffer. Tucker offers an authentic impression of seven common mental illnesses: depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, self-harm, disordered eating, PTSD and borderline personality disorder. 
    
    
    
    Giving a voice to those who often find it hard to speak themselves, Tucker presents a unique window into the day-to-day trials of living with an unwell mind. She pushes readers to reflect on how we think, talk about and treat mental illness in young women.
    Show book