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More Testing Times - Test Flying in the 1980s and '90s - cover

More Testing Times - Test Flying in the 1980s and '90s

Mike Brooke

Publisher: The History Press

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Summary

Following his first three successful books, describing his long career as a military pilot, Mike Brooke completes the story with more tales of test flying during the 1980s and 1990s. During this period his career changed to see him take control of flying at Farnborough and then at Boscombe Down. This often hilarious memoir gives a revealing insight into military and civilian test flying of a wide range of aircraft, weapons and systems. Following on from his previous books, Brooke continues to use his personal experiences to give the reader a unique view of flight trials of the times, successes and failures, and his memoirs make fascinating reading for any aviation enthusiast.

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