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Cracked Heart - Poetic Thoughts on a Life - cover

Cracked Heart - Poetic Thoughts on a Life

Michele Venné

Publisher: Publishdrive

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Summary

The best fodder for the muse are life’s events and circumstances.We all have had situations that molded us, forced us to grow, and made us strong even if we would have chosen an easier path.For the author, writing has become a way of reflecting on life, a chance to process what happened, and an avenue for healing.Includes:
 
75 poems written by the author
 
Suggestions for writing poetry even if you’ve never tried before
 
How to use poetry for healing
Available since: 11/06/2021.

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