Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
Tom at the Farm - cover

Tom at the Farm

Michel Marc Bouchard

Translator Linda Gaboriau

Publisher: Talonbooks

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

There is much buzz about this play in 2012, as it enjoys productions in English and Spanish, as well as a film adaptation, following its 2011 French premiere:• Linda Gaboriau's English translation of Tom and the Coyote will premiere in November 2012 at Toronto's Factory Theatre• The Spanish language production of Tom and the Coyote, Tom en la granja, will be reprised in August 2012 in Mexico City at the Teatro Sergio Magana starring Verónica Langer from the film Y tu mamá también• In May 2012, acclaimed film director Xavier Dolan (Heartbeats; Laurence Anyways) announced he will be adapting Tom and the Coyote for the screen.

Who read this book also read:

  • Captive Voices - New and Selected Poems 1960-2008 - cover

    Captive Voices - New and...

    Eleanor Ross Taylor

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Over nearly fifty years, Eleanor Ross Taylor has established herself as one of the foremost southern poets of her generation. Captive Voices gathers selections from Taylor's five previous books along with a generous helping of new poems. Scintillating, unusual, passionate, and profound, the poems range from contemporary pieces about a bag lady on a bus, to historical pieces about settlers held hostage and a wartime nurse caring for British wounded, to intensely personal poems about her dislike for her grandmother and worries about her son. The title poem -- a real tour de force -- explores the notion of captivity on several levels as it speaks to the suffering we all endure, some of which is of our own making. Decidedly regional yet determinedly universal, the poems in this remarkable volume, along with a foreword by Ellen Bryant Voigt, attest to the singular talent of a woman justly described as "a poet of genius."
    Show book
  • The Best Australian Poems 2016 - cover

    The Best Australian Poems 2016

    Sarah Holland-Batt

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    ‘Above all, poetry – for both its readers and its writers – is a form that demands attentiveness and active intelligence. It treats language as a volatile and charged commodity, and one whose subtleties and nuances are worth puzzling over.’ —Sarah Holland-Batt
    
    Award-winning poet, critic, editor and academic Sarah Holland-Batt takes the helm as editor of this year’s Best Australian Poems. Demonstrating the diversity, inventive brilliance and dynamism of our country’s finest poets, this collection features work from both rising stars and well-known figures, and presents a dazzling array of themes and styles. Whether addressing biotechnology or domestic violence, migrant experience or the natural world, the poems in this anthology are sure to inspire, provoke and move.
    
    Poets include Martin Harrison, Judith Beveridge, Clive James, Keven Brophy, Joanne Burns, Les Murray, Pam Brown, Eileen Chong, Luke Davies, Laurie Duggan, Geoff Page, Ali Cobby Eckermann, Toby Fitch, Robert Gray, Lisa Gorton, Natalie Harkin, John Kinsella, Felicity Plunkett, Chris Wallace-Crabbe, Billy Marshall Stoneking, Cate Kennedy, David Malouf, Julie Chevalier, Lionel G. Fogarty and many more…
    
    Sarah Holland-Batt is the author of The Hazards (UQP, 2015) and Aria (UQP, 2008), which won the Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize, the Arts ACT Judith Wright Award, and the FAW Anne Elder Award and was shortlisted in both the New South Wales and Queensland Premiers’ Literary Awards. She is presently a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at the Queensland University of Technology and the poetry editor of Island.
    Show book
  • The Georgian Poets (1911-1912) - cover

    The Georgian Poets (1911-1912)

    D. H. Lawrence

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    As a poetical movement Georgian Poetry is easy to classify.  It began naturally enough in 1910 when George V ascended to the throne of England.  Edward Marsh, a civil servant, polymath and arts patron decided that the verse of that time needed to be seen in its own right and from 1912 – 1922 set out to publish anthologies. Marsh agreed a deal with the poet and bookseller Harold Munro, who had recently opened The Poetry Bookshop in London’s Devonshire Street to publish the books in return for a share of the profits.   Five volumes spanning some forty poets ranging from Rupert Brooke to GK Chesterton and DH Lawrence were published over the years and remain today the encyclopaedia of this poetical period. Here, in Volume 1, the years 1911 - 1912 are covered.
    Show book
  • June-tree - New and Selected Poems 1974-2000 - cover

    June-tree - New and Selected...

    Peter Balakian

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Prize-winning poet and New York Times-bestselling author Peter Balakian offers the best of his previous poetry, as well as thirteen new poems. 
    For three decades, Peter Balakian's poetry has been praised widely in the United States and abroad. He has created a unique voice in American poetry -- one that is both personal and cosmopolitan. In sensuous, elliptical language, Balakian offers a textured poetry that is beautiful and haunting as it envelops an American grain, the reverberations of the Armenian Genocide, and the wired, discordant realities of contemporary life.
    Show book
  • Hamlet - cover

    Hamlet

    Robert Icke

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    ghost / devil 
    
     
    acting / madness 
    
     
    be / not be 
    
     
    This is the text that was performed during the run at the Almeida Theatre.
    Show book
  • Talking about Movies with Jesus - Poems - cover

    Talking about Movies with Jesus...

    David Kirby

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Celebrated poet David Kirby says that when he was a boy he wanted to run away and join the circus but never found one he liked, so he invented his own. Many of the poems in his dazzling new collection, Talking about Movies with Jesus, suggest his personal carnival is still a work in progress.Much like a traveling circus, Kirby's poems are defined equally by their transient nature and by their destination. The poem "The Phantom Empire" -- which features Gene Autry repeatedly having to escape from a fictional city 20,000 feet underground in order to make it back home in time to voice his afternoon radio show -- suggests that Kirby has discovered the journey to what one is after is often more entertaining than getting it.Yet, in frenetic musings on Bo Diddley, a certain First Lady ("Skinny-Dipping with Pat Nixon"), Kirk Douglas, and Gerald Stern, Kirby notes the importance of arrival. Earnest conversations with cultural icons from Little Richard to Jesus reveal to the poet, as a character in his own story, that art, whether a song or poem or scripture, is all we here on earth know of heaven and all we need to know.Kirby's latest work is at once the caravan, the carnival, and the crowd merging together to form a wondrous collection.
    Show book