You wouldn't limit the air you breathe. Why limit your readings?
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Mr Basketball - George Mikan the Minneapolis Lakers and the Birth of the NBA - cover

Mr Basketball - George Mikan the Minneapolis Lakers and the Birth of the NBA

Michael Schumacher

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Before Shaquille O'Neal and before Bill Russell, there was George Mikan, a six-foot-ten, 240-pound center, whose quiet demeanor and bespectacled face belied his competitive fire. A four-time All-American at DePaul and a six-time professional champion, Mikan was such an unstoppable force-and a national sensation-that, when his Minneapolis Lakers played the New York Knickerbockers in 1949, the marquee outside Madison Square Garden read simply, "George Mikan vs. Knicks."  
Drawing on extensive interviews-with former teammates, opponents, coaches, friends, and rivals-critically acclaimed author Michael Schumacher presents, for the first time, a wonderfully nuanced portrait of one of the most unheralded athletes of our time, and a fascinating look at the birth of the National Basketball Association.  
  
REVIEWS:  
"Schumacher (Family Business) explores the on-court life and legacy of George Mikan, the big man who revolutionized both college and professional basketball as a dominant center in the '40s and '50s and as the American Basketball Association's first commissioner in the 1960s. Several rules in the modern game were enacted to offset 6'10" Mikan's uncommon height advantage at the time: his shot-blocking ability for DePaul University led to the goaltending rule in college basketball in 1943, and his rebounding and scoring for the Minneapolis Lakers prompted the nascent NBA to widen the free-throw lane from six feet to 12 feet in 1951. Wilt Chamberlain described Mikan as the "first true superstar of the league," and Shaquille O'Neal, who paid for Mikan's funeral when he died in 2005 in dire financial straits due to the expenses of his health problems, said, "Without George Mikan, there is no me." A native of Joliet, Ill., Mikan was from a Croatian family and remained a true Midwesterner to the end, Schumacher writes. Schumacher's narrative sometimes gets bogged down with tedious, almost box score-like itemizing of the numerous games from Mikan

Other books that might interest you

  • AL-The Israeli Prometheus - cover

    AL-The Israeli Prometheus

    Vard Yoren

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    AL SCHWIMMER took tremendous risks to provide precious weapons and aerial defense secretly to the beleaguered Jews, outnumbered and threatened with extermination, who could not otherwise have withstood the attacks of five surrounding armies. 
     
    His was a crime and he paid for it. His misdeeds created history. It turned the tide of Israel’s war of independence and enabled the nascent nation to flourish. 
     
    
     
    This book was based entirely on the memoirs and memories as provided by Rina Schwimmer
    Show book
  • Fragments of Memory (Czech) - From Kolin to Jerusalem - cover

    Fragments of Memory (Czech) -...

    Hana Greenfield

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In this powerfully moving account, the author, whose family lived in Kolin, Czechoslovakia, for many generations, shares episodes of her life during and after the Holocaust. Introduction by Vaclav Havel, President of Czech Republic. "The Diary of Anne Frank is now a part of the reading list. I would recommend Hana Greenfield's Fragments of Memory as a better book for young people because where Anne Frank's narrative stops, Greenfield's takes the reader into the heart of darkness and shows what life was in the death camps through the eyes of a teenager.
    Journal of Czech and Slovak History Ruth David
    Show book
  • The Doctor Can’t See You Now - Reflections of a Retiring GP - cover

    The Doctor Can’t See You Now -...

    David John Maddams

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A Doctor’s Dilemma.
     
    Juggling a busy medical career and a carer to two elderly parents, his final year as a GP was never going to be easy. The NHS is on the brink of collapse as David Maddams tells his funny yet poignant story.
    Show book
  • Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose - Feared Even in Captivity - cover

    Netaji Subhash Chandra Bose -...

    Santanu Banerjee

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The book tells the reader how after Second World War, Netaji Subhas Chandra Bose, the tallest Indian freedom fighter, slowly petered out in captivity in former Soviet Union, while Kremlin, taking full military advantage of Bose's presence in their land created fear in American and British political and military strategists and among the post-Independence Indian politicians. The research has also been an outcome of British and Indian Government documents and long interviews with senior Indian political leaders. The book is extremely sensitive as the stakeholders are not only big global powers, but the unresolved issue involves the Indian Government which puts a lid on the mystery by sticking to the fake air crash story in 1945 in Taiwan. It is bound to stir up a lot of heat with scholars – especially among, the British, Indian and American, besides exposing the role of the Russians, Indian Communists and the Nehru family that still heads the Congress now. 
     
    What began as a journey into the unknown, has culminated into this book, an attempt which has taken 32 long years for the author.  The research also reveals Bose's socio-political ideology about which he spoke during his Tokyo University speech on the Indian Civilization and how India would have `socialism with a human face.' It also happens to be an issue so far neglected by scholars and historians.
    Show book
  • Goodbye Sweet Girl - A Story of Domestic Violence and Survival - cover

    Goodbye Sweet Girl - A Story of...

    Kelly Sundberg

    • 2
    • 8
    • 0
    "In her stunning memoir, Kelly Sundberg examines the heart-breaking bonds of love, detailing her near decade-long marriage’s slide into horrific abuse. Sundberg shares her own confusions, fears and empathy for her violent husband, even as she comes to realize he will never change. This is an immensely courageous story that will break your heart, leave you in tears, and, finally, offer hope and redemption. Brava, Kelly Sundberg."—Rene Denfeld, author of The Child Finder 
    "A fierce, frightening, soulful reckoning—Goodbye, Sweet Girl is an expertly rendered memoir that investigates why we stay in relationships that hurt us, and how we survive when we leave them. Kelly Sundberg is a force. She has written the rare book that has the power to change lives."—Christa Parravani, author of Her: A Memoir 
    In this brave and beautiful memoir, written with the raw honesty and devastating openness of The Glass Castle and The Liar’s Club, a woman chronicles how her marriage devolved from a love story into a shocking tale of abuse—examining the tenderness and violence entwined in the relationship, why she endured years of physical and emotional pain, and how she eventually broke free. 
    "You made me hit you in the face," he said mournfully. "Now everyone is going to know." "I know," I said. "I’m sorry." 
    Kelly Sundberg’s husband, Caleb, was a funny, warm, supportive man and a wonderful father to their little boy Reed. He was also vengeful and violent. But Sundberg did not know that when she fell in love, and for years told herself he would get better. It took a decade for her to ultimately accept that the partnership she desired could not work with such a broken man. In her remarkable book, she offers an intimate record of the joys and terrors that accompanied her long, difficult awakening, and presents a haunting, heartbreaking glimpse into why women remain too long in dangerous relationships. 
    To understand herself and her violent marriage, Sundberg looks to her childhood in Salmon, a small, isolated mountain community known as the most redneck town in Idaho. Like her marriage, Salmon is a place of deep contradictions, where Mormon ranchers and hippie back-to-landers live side-by-side; a place of magical beauty riven by secret brutality; a place that takes pride in its individualism and rugged self-sufficiency, yet is beholden to church and communal standards at all costs. 
    Mesmerizing and poetic, Goodbye, Sweet Girl is a harrowing, cautionary, and ultimately redemptive tale that brilliantly illuminates one woman’s transformation as she gradually rejects the painful reality of her violent life at the hands of the man who is supposed to cherish her, begins to accept responsibility for herself, and learns to believe that she deserves better.
    Show book
  • Insomniac Dreams - Experiments with Time by Vladimir Nabokov - cover

    Insomniac Dreams - Experiments...

    Vladimir Nabokov

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Nabokov's dream diary, published for the first time—and placed in biographical and literary context 
    On October 14, 1964, Vladimir Nabokov, a lifelong insomniac, began a curious experiment. Over the next eighty days, immediately upon waking, he wrote down his dreams, following the instructions he found in An Experiment with Time by the British philosopher John Dunne. The purpose was to test the theory that time may go in reverse, so that, paradoxically, a later event may generate an earlier dream. The result—published here for the first time—is a fascinating diary in which Nabokov recorded sixty-four dreams (and subsequent daytime episodes) on 118 index cards, which afford a rare glimpse of the artist at his most private. More than an odd biographical footnote, the experiment grew out of Nabokov’s passionate interest in the mystery of time, which influenced many of his novels, including the late masterpiece Ada. 
    Insomniac Dreams, edited by leading Nabokov authority Gennady Barabtarlo, presents the text of Nabokov’s dream experiment, illustrated with a selection of his original index cards, and provides rich annotations and analysis that put them in the context of his life and writings. The book also includes previously unpublished records of Nabokov’s dreams from his letters and notebooks and shows important connections between his fiction and private writings on dreams and time.
    Show book