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The Founders' Revolution - The Forgotten History & Principles of the Declaration of Independence - cover

The Founders' Revolution - The Forgotten History & Principles of the Declaration of Independence

Michael S. Law

Publisher: Morgan James Publishing

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Summary

A historian’s “revealing and much-needed retelling of the writing of the Declaration of Independence and the events that led up to it” (William D. Watkins, author of The New Absolutes).   Tying American history to our current political climate, The Founders’ Revolution is designed to help readers understand the principles embedded in the Declaration of Independence. The book unpacks the intent of the Founding Fathers in drafting the document, and the historical circumstances surrounding its development.   Every charge and every paragraph of the Declaration of Independence is discussed with supporting evidence coming from the original words of the Founding Fathers and other original source documents. The Founders’ Revolution also makes astute comparisons between actions taken by America’s current federal government and those taken by the King of England at the time of the Declaration, showing how our founding document and its principles are still applicable today.   In this revealing history, readers will rediscover the forgotten treasures of the Declaration of Independence, recognizing the dedication of the Founding Fathers to the principles written down.
Available since: 01/02/2018.
Print length: 235 pages.

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