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Austin 3:16 - 316 Facts and Stories about Stone Cold Steve Austin - cover

Austin 3:16 - 316 Facts and Stories about Stone Cold Steve Austin

Michael McAvennie

Publisher: ECW Press

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Summary

316 facts about WWE legend Stone Cold Steve Austin.
		 
What’s “3:16 Day”? It’s a day when someone gives you a load of crap, and you give it back with a certain one-fingered gesture. “3:16 Day” is a day when you can open up a can of whoop-ass on anybody you want. A day when four-letter words are acceptable and the speed limit is only a suggestion. 
		 
“3:16 Day” is a day that epitomizes Stone Cold Steve Austin, the toughest S.O.B. ever to lace up a pair of boots. Austin launched WWE’s Attitude Era the moment he won the 1996 King of the Ring Tournament and quoted iconic scripture on his bible-thumping opponent: “Austin 3:16 says I just whipped your ass!”
		 
Austin 3:16 celebrates the WWE legend’s finest moments in the ring, on the microphone, and behind the wheel of a beer truck, a Zamboni, and a cement mixer. This book collects 316 Stone Cold facts, figures, and catchphrases that uncover little known facets about sports entertainment’s Texas Rattlesnake, including how he conceived the “Stone Cold” moniker, what he really thinks of adversaries Mr. McMahon, The Rock, and Bret “Hit Man” Hart, and why he has the WWE Universe shouting “What?” all the time.
		 
Bottom line? Austin 3:16 says it all, ’cause Stone Cold said so!
Available since: 03/16/2021.

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