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The Case of the Golden State Killer - Based on the Podcast with Additional Commentary Photographs and Documents - cover

The Case of the Golden State Killer - Based on the Podcast with Additional Commentary Photographs and Documents

Michael Ferguson, Michael Morford

Publisher: WildBlue Press

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Summary

By the creators of Criminology: a complete chronicle of the Golden State serial killer investigation, including photographs and documents.   In 1976, a serial rapist terrorized California’s Sacramento County, breaking into homes and leaving a trail of destruction behind him. As the masked predator expanded his turf, his evil urges drove him to murder. In Northern California, he was known as the East Area Rapist. In Southern California, he was called the Original Night Stalker. When his crimes were finally connected, he would become known as the Golden State Killer. By 1986, he had committed a staggering tally of crimes, including at least 12 murders. In season two of their popular podcast, Criminology, veteran podcaster Mike Morford and true crime researcher Mike Ferguson unmasked this killer in a story that spans more than forty years. Joined by the investigators who hunted him, the witnesses who saw him, and the survivors who lived to tell their stories, Criminology Season Two: The Case of the Golden State Killer examines the story of the most prolific serial rapist and murderer in American history. Now, The Case of the Golden State Killer presents an even more complete chronicle of this true crime story. Based on the podcast, this digital volume features additional commentary, photographs and primary source documents.

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