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Smoke & Mirrors - cover

Smoke & Mirrors

Michael Faudet

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

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Summary

Michael Faudet’s latest book takes the reader on an emotionally charged journey, exploring the joys of falling madly in love and the melancholy world of the brokenhearted. Beautifully captured in poetry, prose, and short stories, Faudet's whimsical and sometimes erotic writing has captured the hearts and minds of thousands of readers from around the world.

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