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Living Aboard Around the World - cover

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Living Aboard Around the World

Michael Briant

Publisher: Accent Press

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Summary

If you are planning to live aboard your sailing boat then this book is essential reading. Written by Michael E Briant it is a complete guide to living aboard and circumnavigating the world.

 
Chapters:


Which Boat and What Equipment?


The Canal Route to the Sun.


The Sea Route to the Sun.


Cruising the Mediterranean


Crossing the Atlantic


Cruising the Caribbean.


Panama and Pan-Pan


The Canal and into the Pacific


South Pacific Islands


Tahiti to New Zealand


Helicopter Rescue


The Great Barrier Reef


Pirate Attack


Tragedy in the Red Sea.


Homeward Bound

 
 

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