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Down Salem Way - A Loving Husband Story - cover

Down Salem Way - A Loving Husband Story

Meredith Allard

Publisher: Copperfield Press

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Summary

How would you deal with the madness of the Salem witch hunts?In 1690, James Wentworth arrives in Salem in the Massachusetts Bay Colony with his father, John, hoping to continue the success of John’s mercantile business. While in Salem, James falls in love with Elizabeth Jones, a farmer’s daughter. Though they are virtually strangers when they marry, the love between James and Elizabeth grows quickly into a passion that will transcend time.But something evil lurks down Salem way. Soon many in Salem, town and village, are accused of practicing witchcraft and sending their shapes to harm others. Despite the madness surrounding them, James and Elizabeth are determined to continue the peaceful, loving life they have created together. Will their love for one another carry them through the most difficult challenge of all?Down Salem Way is the long-awaited prequel to the bestselling paranormal historical Loving Husband Trilogy.

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