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War So Much War - cover

War So Much War

Mercè Rodoreda

Translator Maruxa Relaño, Martha Tennent

Publisher: Open Letter

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Summary

The first Mercè Rodoreda book Open Letter published—Death in Spring—continues to be one of the press's best-selling books, after having been featured in the New Yorker, on NPR, and in dozens of other publications. A new translation of La plaça del Diamant came out last year and sparked a renewed interest in Rodoreda's work.  Rodoreda is considered by many to be the greatest Catalan writer of all time—and one of the best female European writers of the past century.  Two of her books are available from Open Letter, and a couple others are available from Graywolf.

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