As many books as you want!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Queer: A Graphic History - cover

Queer: A Graphic History

Meg-John Barker

Publisher: Icon Books

  • 2
  • 33
  • 0

Summary

'Queer: A Graphic History Could Totally Change the Way You Think About Sex and Gender' Vice

Activist-academic Meg-John Barker and cartoonist Jules Scheele illuminate the histories of queer thought and LGBTQ+ action in this groundbreaking non-fiction graphic novel.

From identity politics and gender roles to privilege and exclusion, Queer explores how we came to view sex, gender and sexuality in the ways that we do; how these ideas get tangled up with our culture and our understanding of biology, psychology and sexology; and how these views have been disputed and challenged.

Along the way we look at key landmarks which shift our perspective of what’s ‘normal’ – Alfred Kinsey’s view of sexuality as a spectrum, Judith Butler’s view of gendered behaviour as a performance, the play Wicked, or moments in Casino Royale when we’re invited to view James Bond with the kind of desiring gaze usually directed at female bodies in mainstream media. 

Presented in a brilliantly engaging and witty style, this is a unique portrait of the universe of queer thinking.

Other books that might interest you

  • The United Symbolism of America - Deciphering Hidden Meanings in America's Most Familiar Art Architecture and Logos - cover

    The United Symbolism of America...

    Robert Hieronimus

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Statue of Liberty is an ancient goddess. But why are there seven rays emanating from her crown? And why was the torch switched from her left to her right hand? Did you know that the 13 stars and stripes are not simply to honor the 13 colonies? Or why the six-pointed stars on the original American flag were changed to five-pointed stars?  Did you know the CBS eye logo is considered by many to be the eye of the devil watching over us?  Were you aware that the Washington Monument resembles an Egyptian obelisk channeling energy? America is young, but its symbols are old. Of the symbols and myths we chose since European colonization, the ones that have become American icons are those representing hope, positive growth, and opportunity. Many of the symbols included in The United Symbolism of America have become so familiar that most of us don't give them a second glance, let alone a second thought. Unfortunately, our patriotic symbols today have become so commonplace that, at best, we associate them with politicians we support. At worst, some believe that all American symbols are evil and Satanic. Hundreds of corporate logos are supposedly linked to this evil conspiracy and proof of its existence.Author Robert R. Hieronimus will help you see the symbolic messages encoded for us by our Founding Fathers in the symbols they chose. Unlike other writers on this topic, Hieronimus includes the historical background and the artistic influences behind the official design of each of these landmarks. In addition, he gives an archetypal interpretation based on the numbers, colors, patterns, and themes, and their usage in societies around the world.
    Show book
  • Psychology and the East - (From Vols 10 11 13 18 Collected Works) - cover

    Psychology and the East - (From...

    C. G. Jung

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Extracted from Volumes 10, 11, 13, and 18. Includes Commentary on The Secret of the Golden Flower, Psychological Commentary on The Tibetan Book of the Dead and The Tibetan Book of the Great Liberation, Foreword to Suzuki's Introduction to Zen Buddhism, and Foreword to the I Ching.
    Show book
  • Murderous Minds - Exploring the Psychopathic Brain: Neurological Imaging and the Manifestation of Evil - cover

    Murderous Minds - Exploring the...

    Dean Haycock

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    How many times have you seen a murder on the news or on a TV show like CSI: Crime Scene Investigation, and said to yourself, “How could someone do something like that?”Today, neuroscientists are imaging, mapping, testing and dissecting the source of the worst behavior imaginable in the brains of the people who lack a conscience: psychopaths. Neuroscientist Dean Haycock examines the behavior of real life psychopaths and discusses how their actions can be explained in scientific terms, from research that literally looks inside their brains to understanding how psychopaths, without empathy but very goal-oriented, think and act the way they do. Some don’t commit crimes at all, but rather make use of their skills in the boardroom.But what does this mean for lawyers, judges, psychiatrists, victims, and readers—for anyone who has ever wondered how some people can be so bad. Could your nine-year-old be a psychopath? What about your co-worker? The ability to recognize psychopaths using the scientific method has vast implications for society, and yet is still loaded with consequences.
    Show book
  • No Visible Bruises - What We Don’t Know About Domestic Violence Can Kill Us - cover

    No Visible Bruises - What We...

    Rachel Louise Snyder

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    WINNER OF THE HILLMAN PRIZE FOR BOOK JOURNALISM, THE HELEN BERNSTEIN BOOK AWARD, AND THE LUKAS WORK-IN-PROGRESS AWARD * A NEW YORK TIMES TOP 10 BOOKS OF THE YEAR * NATIONAL BOOK CRITICS CIRCLE AWARD FINALIST * LOS ANGELES TIMES BOOK PRIZE FINALIST * ABA SILVER GAVEL AWARD FINALIST * KIRKUS PRIZE FINALIST  
     
    NAMED ONE OF THE BEST BOOKS OF 2019 BY: Esquire, Amazon, Kirkus, Library Journal, Publishers Weekly, BookPage, BookRiot, Economist, New York Times Staff Critics 
     
    “A seminal and breathtaking account of why home is the most dangerous place to be a woman . . . A tour de force.” -Eve Ensler 
      
     "Terrifying, courageous reportage from our internal war zone." -Andrew Solomon 
      
     "Extraordinary." -New York Times ,“Editors' Choice” 
      
     “Gut-wrenching, required reading.” -Esquire 
      
     "Compulsively readable . . . It will save lives." -Washington Post  
     
    “Essential, devastating reading.” -Cheryl Strayed, New York Times Book Review 
      
     An award-winning journalist's intimate investigation of the true scope of domestic violence, revealing how the roots of America's most pressing social crises are buried in abuse that happens behind closed doors.  
      
     We call it domestic violence. We call it private violence. Sometimes we call it intimate terrorism. But whatever we call it, we generally do not believe it has anything at all to do with us, despite the World Health Organization deeming it a “global epidemic.” In America, domestic violence accounts for 15 percent of all violent crime, and yet it remains locked in silence, even as its tendrils reach unseen into so many of our most pressing national issues, from our economy to our education system, from mass shootings to mass incarceration to #MeToo. We still have not taken the true measure of this problem. 
      
     In No Visible Bruises, journalist Rachel Louise Snyder gives context for what we don't know we're seeing. She frames this urgent and immersive account of the scale of domestic violence in our country around key stories that explode the common myths-that if things were bad enough, victims would just leave; that a violent person cannot become nonviolent; that shelter is an adequate response; and most insidiously that violence inside the home is a private matter, sealed from the public sphere and disconnected from other forms of violence. Through the stories of victims, perpetrators, law enforcement, and reform movements from across the country, Snyder explores the real roots of private violence, its far-reaching consequences for society, and what it will take to truly address it.
    Show book
  • Synchronicity - An Acausal Connecting Principle (From Vol 8 of the Collected Works of C G Jung) - cover

    Synchronicity - An Acausal...

    C. G. Jung

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Jung was intrigued from early in his career with coincidences, especially those surprising juxtapositions that scientific rationality could not adequately explain. He discussed these ideas with Albert Einstein before World War I, but first used the term "synchronicity" in a 1930 lecture, in reference to the unusual psychological insights generated from consulting the I Ching. A long correspondence and friendship with the Nobel Prize-winning physicist Wolfgang Pauli stimulated a final, mature statement of Jung's thinking on synchronicity, originally published in 1952 and reproduced here. Together with a wealth of historical and contemporary material, this essay describes an astrological experiment Jung conducted to test his theory. Synchronicity reveals the full extent of Jung's research into a wide range of psychic phenomena. 
      This paperback edition of Jung's classic work includes a new foreword by Sonu Shamdasani, Philemon Professor of Jung History at University College London.
    Show book
  • Deeper Than Indigo - Tracing Thomas Machell Forgotten Explorer - cover

    Deeper Than Indigo - Tracing...

    Jenny Balfour Paul

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    After discovering the diaries of Victorian explorer Thomas Machell in the dusty recesses of the British Library, Jenny set out on her own voyage, tracing his footsteps across oceans and continents for ten years, on a quest to discover and understand this extraordinary character. In 2010 she travelled alone to India on the last cargo ship to accept passengers. The journey was as treacherous as it had been in Thomas's day and Jenny was advised to hide below deck and sleep with a knife by her bed and dollars sewn into her jacket. She narrowly escaped attack as naval ships intercepted a pirate 'mothership' spotted off the Yemeni coast. Jenny's journey ends as she finally discovers Thomas's overgrown grave when travelling with herdaughter after over 15 years of searching. Through a combination of the author's own memoirs, sketches and recollections of travels, entwined with Thomas Machell's tales and intricate drawings, Deeper than Indigo offers a unique insight into the social history of British colonialism at its height, from the East India Company to the Raj, while telling the story of a forgotten pioneer, whose startling diaries shed a surprisingly progressive light on European colonialism.
    Show book