Enjoy 2020 without limits!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
Places I Stopped on the Way Home - A Memoir of Chaos and Grace - cover

Places I Stopped on the Way Home - A Memoir of Chaos and Grace

Meg Fee

Publisher: Icon Books

  • 1
  • 3
  • 0

Summary

'Fee writes with stunning honesty ... utterly breathtaking' - Bustle


A beautiful memoir from an exciting young writer, Meg Fee, on finding her way in New York City. Full of the dramas and quiet moments that make up a life, told with humour, heart, and hope. 


In Places I Stopped on the Way Home, Meg Fee plots a decade of her life in New York City – from falling in love at the Lincoln Center to escaping the roommate (and bedbugs) from hell on Thompson Street, chasing false promises on 66th Street and the wrong men everywhere, and finding true friendships over glasses of wine in Harlem and Greenwich Village. 

Weaving together her joys and sorrows, expectations and uncertainties, aspirations and realities, the result is an exhilarating collection of essays about love and friendship, failure and suffering, and above all hope. Join Meg on her heart-wrenching journey, as she cuts the difficult path to finding herself and finding home.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Diary of Mary Berg - Growing up in the Warsaw Ghetto - cover

    The Diary of Mary Berg - Growing...

    SL Schneiderman, Susan Lee Pentlin

    • 1
    • 2
    • 0
    A revised edition of an extraordinary record of life in the Warsaw Ghetto, first published in 1945, before the end of World War 2. Originally edited by SL Schneiderman, this edition has a new introduction by Susan Lee Pentlin.On her fifteenth birthday, as the German army tightens its grip on Warsaw, Mary Berg begins writing her diary. She does not yet know that by the time she has filled twelve small notebooks she will have endured four years of Nazi terror and recorded in vivid detail some of the most important events of the twentieth century.From the siege of Warsaw to the final, brutal suppression of the Ghetto Uprising, she documents the plight of the refugees, the lives of the nouveaux riches, the forced conscription, the deportations and the heroism of the resistance fighters who rose up against German oppression. Rescued with her family through an allied prisoner exchange, Mary smuggled out of Warsaw the diary she had begun four years earlier. In doing so, she brought to light one of the most incredible documents of the Second World War - the uniquely personal story of a life-loving girl's encounter with unparalleled human suffering, and an extraordinary insight into one  of the darkest chapters of history.
    Show book
  • Fragments of Memory (Czech) - From Kolin to Jerusalem - cover

    Fragments of Memory (Czech) -...

    Hana Greenfield

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    In this powerfully moving account, the author, whose family lived in Kolin, Czechoslovakia, for many generations, shares episodes of her life during and after the Holocaust. Introduction by Vaclav Havel, President of Czech Republic. "The Diary of Anne Frank is now a part of the reading list. I would recommend Hana Greenfield's Fragments of Memory as a better book for young people because where Anne Frank's narrative stops, Greenfield's takes the reader into the heart of darkness and shows what life was in the death camps through the eyes of a teenager.
    Journal of Czech and Slovak History Ruth David
    Show book
  • Little White Squaw - A White Woman's Story of Abuse Addiction and Reconciliation - cover

    Little White Squaw - A White...

    Eve Mills Nash, Kenneth J. Harvey

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    I was only six when I suspected my skin might be the wrong colour...  
    Born female on the wrong side of the tracks, Eve Mills Nash, with the help of co-author Kenneth J. Harvey, tells a hard-hitting tale of a lifelong fascination with men of a darker hue. From early childhood, Nash knew it was "something to do with what was inside the bottles" that encouraged the groping male fingers that casually abused her during her parents' drunken parties. She soon discovered that the wine remnants in the revellers' discarded cups would numb her pain. Nash's fortuneteller grandmother predicted a future of violence for her, starting as a teenager with her marriage to first husband Stan, an Ontario Mohawk. What Nash's grandmother didn't prophesize was the drunken binges and revolving door of unstable partners that traumatized her children, left her suicidal, and convinced her she was a failure as a mother after her eldest daughter became a cocaine addict. Harrowing yet life-affirming, this blistering account of life on the cusp of New Brunswick's Native community sees the Little White Squaw and her children balance precariously between two seemingly irreconcilable cultures and colours.
    Show book
  • Rewired - An Unlikely Doctor a Brave Amputee and the Medical Miracle That Made History - cover

    Rewired - An Unlikely Doctor a...

    Dr. Ajay K. Seth

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    A raccoon bite on the arm doesn’t seem that serious, but it soon becomes a life-or-death medical crisis for Melissa Loomis. After days of treatment for recurring infection, it becomes obvious that her arm must be amputated. Dr. Ajay Seth, the son of immigrant parents from India and a local orthopaedic surgeon in private practice, performs his first-ever amputation procedure. In the months that follow, divine intervention, combined with Melissa’s determination and Dr. Seth’s disciplined commitment and dedication to his patients, brings about the opportunity for a medical breakthrough that will potentially transform the lives of amputees around the world.Rewired is the inspirational, miraculous story of Dr. Seth’s revolutionary surgery that allows Melissa to not just move a prosthetic arm simply by thinking, but to actually feel with the prosthetic hand, just as she would with her natural arm. This resulted in what others have recognized as the world’s most advanced amputee, all done from Dr. Seth’s private practice in a community hospital, using a local staff, and with no special training or extensive research funding.
    Show book
  • The Invented Part - cover

    The Invented Part

    Rodrigo Fresán

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    "A kaleidoscopic, open-hearted, shamelessly polymathic storyteller, the kind who brings a blast of oxygen into the room."—Jonathan Lethem 
    An aging writer, disillusioned with the state of literary culture, attempts to disappear in the most cosmically dramatic manner: traveling to the Hadron Collider, merging with the God particle, and transforming into an omnipresent deity—a meta-writer—capable of rewriting reality. 
    With biting humor and a propulsive, contagious style, amid the accelerated particles of his characteristic obsessions—the writing of F. Scott Fitzgerald, the music of Pink Floyd and The Kinks, 2001: A Space Odyssey, the links between great art and the lives of the artists who create it—Fresán takes us on a whirlwind tour of writers and muses, madness and genius, friendships, broken families, and alternate realities, exploring themes of childhood, loss, memory, aging, and death. 
    Drawing inspiration from the scope of modern classics and the structural pyrotechnics of the postmodern masters, the Argentine once referred to as "a pop Borges" delivers a powerful defense of great literature, a celebration of reading and writing, of the invented parts—the stories we tell ourselves to give shape to our world. 
    Rodrigo Fresán is the author of nine books of fiction that together compose an expansive, interconnected fictional universe—a complex system of storylines, resonances, and self-reference that call to mind the works of David Foster Wallace, Thomas Pynchon, and Roberto Bolaño. 
    Will Vanderhyden received fellowships from the NEA and Lannan Foundation to work on The Invented Part.
    Show book
  • Love Loss and What We Ate - A Memoir - cover

    Love Loss and What We Ate - A...

    Padma Lakshmi

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    A vivid memoir of food and family, survival and triumph, Love, Loss, and What We Ate traces the arc of Padma Lakshmi’s unlikely path from an immigrant childhood to a complicated life in front of the camera—a tantalizing blend of Ruth Reichl’s Tender at the Bone and Nora Ephron’s Heartburn 
    Long before Padma Lakshmi ever stepped onto a television set, she learned that how we eat is an extension of how we love, how we comfort, how we forge a sense of home—and how we taste the world as we navigate our way through it. Shuttling between continents as a child, she lived a life of dislocation that would become habit as an adult, never quite at home in the world. And yet, through all her travels, her favorite food remained the simple rice she first ate sitting on the cool floor of her grandmother’s kitchen in South India. 
    Poignant and surprising, Love, Loss, and What We Ate is Lakshmi’s extraordinary account of her journey from that humble kitchen, ruled by ferocious and unforgettable women, to the judges’ table of Top Chef and beyond. It chronicles the fierce devotion of the remarkable people who shaped her along the way, from her headstrong mother who flouted conservative Indian convention to make a life in New York, to her Brahmin grandfather—a brilliant engineer with an irrepressible sweet tooth—to the man seemingly wrong for her in every way who proved to be her truest ally. A memoir rich with sensual prose and punctuated with evocative recipes, it is alive with the scents, tastes, and textures of a life that spans complex geographies both internal and external. 
    Love, Loss, and What We Ate is an intimate and unexpected story of food and family—both the ones we are born to and the ones we create—and their enduring legacies.
    Show book