Subscribe and enjoy more than 1 million books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced 7236434c7af12f85357591f712aa5cce47c3d377e8addfc98f989c55a4ef4ca5
The Poetry of May Sarton Volume One - Letters from Maine Inner Landscape and Halfway to Silence - cover

The Poetry of May Sarton Volume One - Letters from Maine Inner Landscape and Halfway to Silence

May Sarton

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 2
  • 0

Summary

Three celebrated volumes of verse from a feminist icon, poet, and author of the groundbreaking novel Mrs. Stevens Hears the Mermaids Singing.  Letters from Maine: A rugged coastline provides a stark background for Sarton’s images of a tragically brief love. With vulnerability and emotional depth, she explores the willingness to devote everything to a new love, as well as the despair at the memory of what is left over when it fades.  Inner Landscape: This collection of May Sarton’s poems displays her inimitable mix of stately verse and depth of feeling that lurks beneath every line, creating a tantalizing, magnetically charged distance between reader and poet.  Halfway to Silence: After decades of writing flowing lyric verse, May Sarton’s style turned to short, vibrant bursts of poetry. These condensed poems are rife with exuberant impressions of nature and of love, including two of her most acclaimed works, “Old Lovers at the Ballet” and “Of the Muse.”   Recognized as a true pioneer in lesbian literature, “Sarton’s poems enter and illuminate every natural corner of our lives. . . . So strong in their faith and in their positive response to the human condition that they will outlast much of the fashionable, cynical poetry of our ear” (James Martin).  

Other books that might interest you

  • Inspirationalism Poetry - cover

    Inspirationalism Poetry

    Guillermo E. Vargas

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    inspirationalism is a way to express yourself. I depict my situations in life and put them in words. I get inspired to write by listening to music, watching movies or life experiences. My writings are about love, depression and hate. At the end love overcomes all in my book. The book is my heart on paper.
    Show book
  • I Love My Love - cover

    I Love My Love

    Reyna Biddy

    • 2
    • 2
    • 0
    The debut collection from 22-year-old poet Reyna Biddy, I Love My Love tells the story of Reyna's childhood, her parents’ toxic relationship, and how, against all odds, she learned to love herself.
    Show book
  • Empty Bottles Full of Stories - cover

    Empty Bottles Full of Stories

    Robert M. Drake, r.h. Sin

    • 0
    • 23
    • 1
    What are you hiding behind your smile? If those empty bottles that line the walls of your room could speak, what tales would they spill? So much of your truth is buried beneath the lies you tell yourself. There’s a need to scream to the moon; there’s this urge to go out into the darkness of the night to purge. There are so many stories living inside your soul, you just want the opportunity to tell them. And when you can’t find the will to express what lives within your heart, these words will give you peace. These words will set you free.
    Show book
  • The Big Book of Haikus - Haiku Collection #6 - cover

    The Big Book of Haikus - Haiku...

    Jessica Rivers

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Haikus are one of my favorite forms of poetry. I've combined a bunch that I have written over the years into a book. Please enjoy over 100 haikus!The Big Book of Haikus 
     
    This is the last book in the series and one of the best in my opinion. Many of these haikus I've submitted and posted to my blog and gotten really good feedback. I hope you all enjoy.
    Show book
  • Live or Die - Poems - cover

    Live or Die - Poems

    Anne Sexton

    • 1
    • 7
    • 0
    Winner of the Pulitzer Prize: A gripping poetry collection mapping the thorny journey from madness to hope With her emotionally raw and deeply resonant third collection, Live or Die, Anne Sexton confirmed her place among the most celebrated poets of the twentieth century. Sexton described the volume, which depicts a fictionalized version of her struggle with mental illness, as “a fever chart for a bad case of melancholy.” From the halls of a psychiatric hospital—“the scene of the disordered scenes” in “Flee on Your Donkey”—to a child’s playroom—“a graveyard full of dolls” in “Those Times . . .”—these gripping poems offer profound insight on the agony of depression and the staggering acts of courage and faith required to emerge from its depths.   Along with other confessional poets like Sylvia Plath and Robert Lowell, Sexton was known for grappling with intimate subjects traditionally considered taboo for poetry such as motherhood, menstruation, and drug dependence. Live or Die features these topics in candid and unflinching detail, as Sexton represents the full experience of being alive—and a woman—as few poets have before. Through bold images and startlingly precise language, Sexton explores the broad spectrum of human emotion ranging from desperate despair to unfettered hope.
    Show book
  • Dream Work - cover

    Dream Work

    Mary Oliver

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Dream Work, a collection of forty-five poems, follows both chrono­logically and logically Mary Oliver's American Primitive, which won her the Pulitzer Prize for the finest book of poetry published in 1983 by an American poet.  The depth and diversity of perceptual awareness—so steadfast and radiant in American Primitive—continue in DreamWork. She has turned her attention in these poems to the solitary and difficult labors of the spirit—to accepting the truth about one's personal world, and to valuing the triumphs while transcending the fail­ures of human relationships.  Whether by way of inheritance—as in her poem about the Holocaust—or through a painful glimpse into the present—as in Acid, a poem about an injured boy begging in the streets of Indonesia—the events and tendencies of history take on a new importance here.  More deeply than in her previous volumes, the sensibility behind these poems has merged with the world. Mary Oliver's willingness to be joyful continues, deepened by self-awareness, by experience, and by choice.
    Show book