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Collected Poems - 1930–1973 - cover

Collected Poems - 1930–1973

May Sarton

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

A splendidly edited anthology of the greatest poems of one of America’s finest writers From the very beginning of May Sarton’s career, in her fiction, memoir, and poetry, her work has been touched by a deep sense of order. The careful structure of her work provides an elegant backdrop against which her emotions are free to unfold, rising up through the cracks and fissures of her poems’ architecture only to pass through and disappear like a summer thunderstorm. The author’s search for reason, love of nature, and diverse passions are on full display in this masterful collection, illustrating why May Sarton is considered one of the twentieth century’s finest literary minds.

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