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A Durable Fire - Poems - cover

A Durable Fire - Poems

May Sarton

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

Poetic meditations on solitude by acclaimed author May SartonThis collection borrows its title from Sir Walter Raleigh, who wrote, “Love is a durable fire / In the mind ever burning.” It is a fitting sentiment for a collection on solitude, wherein the author finds herself full of emotion even in seclusion. The first poem, “Gestalt at Sixty,” finds the author reflecting on the joy and loneliness of being solitary. A Durable Fire is a transformative work by a masterful poet.

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