Subscribe and enjoy more than 800,000 books
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
A Durable Fire - Poems - cover

A Durable Fire - Poems

May Sarton

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Poetic meditations on solitude by acclaimed author May SartonThis collection borrows its title from Sir Walter Raleigh, who wrote, “Love is a durable fire / In the mind ever burning.” It is a fitting sentiment for a collection on solitude, wherein the author finds herself full of emotion even in seclusion. The first poem, “Gestalt at Sixty,” finds the author reflecting on the joy and loneliness of being solitary. A Durable Fire is a transformative work by a masterful poet.

Other books that might interest you

  • Pillow Thoughts - cover

    Pillow Thoughts

    Courtney Peppernell

    • 2
    • 9
    • 0
    Pillow Thoughts is a collection of poetry and prose about heartbreak, love, and raw emotions. It is divided into sections to read when you feel you need them most.
    Show book
  • Shards from the Polar Ice - Selected Poems - cover

    Shards from the Polar Ice -...

    Lydia Grigorieva

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “It would be hard to imagine Russian poetry in the last half century without Lydia Grigorieva,” writes eminent Russian poet and critic Konstantin Kedrov. Grigorieva is a uniquely individual voice, bucking the trends of modernist poetry to create her own distinctive and beguiling body of poetry.
     
    Her work draws on her own remarkable life to create startlingly arresting images and metaphors, full of beauty and power, from her series that emerged from her Arctic childhood, to the troubles that beset Ukraine. Her range of influences is wide, and Beethoven, Freud, Sylvia Plath and Byron all appear in her poems as well as more familiar Russian images.
     
    At the heart of Grigorieva’s poetry is what she calls its ‘musicality’ – her firm belief in the power of rhyme and rhythm in creating a poetic experience. In this first major collection of her work in English, English poet John Farndon, working with Grigorieva and co-translator Olga Nakston, has recreated this musicality in English so that English readers might experience for the first time what makes her work so revered in her Russian homeland.
     
    Translated by John Farndon with Olga Nakston. Maxim Hodak - Максим Ходак (Publisher),
     
    Max Mendor - Макс Мендор (Director),
     
    Ksenia Papazova (Managing Editor).
    Show book
  • the witch doesn't burn in this one - cover

    the witch doesn't burn in this one

    Amanda Lovelace, ladybookmad

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The witch: supernaturally powerful, inscrutably independent, and now—indestructible. These moving, relatable poems encourage resilience and embolden women to take control of their own stories. Enemies try to judge, oppress, and marginalize her, but the witch doesn’t burn in this one. 
    Show book
  • Ko vdre senca When the Shadow Breaks Lorsque l'ombre force - cover

    Ko vdre senca When the Shadow...

    Tomaž Šalamun

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Tomaž Šalamun confronts the abyss and overcomes it by creating an even deeper abyss in an incredibly physical language that swallows the original. This new metamorphosed abyss is, then, more like a well, nurturing even as it brings forth its water from the mysterious depths of language. Of course other influences are drawn from that well — Vallejo, Breton, Khlebnikov, Hikmet, O'Hara. The result is a language of non-sequiturs, contradictions, literalized figures of speech, hyperbolic claims, episodic fragments, intense confessions, false causalities, askew parallelisms, — all enhancing the poetry's juxtapositions of the cosmic and the trivial, redefining each in terms of the other. As poet Trenna Sharpe says, “I love Tomas Šalamun's poems for their roaring and zany associative movements. One can't help but feeling a little bit out of breath, a little in shock, after finishing one. It's as if the the poem knocks you down a hill: you tumble down getting all twisted and bounced and disoriented, and at the end you stand up dizzy and out of breath, but when you look back, the grass is bent, a branch is broken, maybe your sock fell off somewhere along the way, and you can figure out just how you got to the bottom”. This is a poetry that fulfills English poet W. H. Auden's definition as a remaking of the language, and more,
    For Šalamun, the poem must always be engaged in a quest for what it cannot say in traditional terms: “The poet is a hunter, not an expresser”, he says in an interview. “You express what you already have. The inexpressible is like the beast in the woods that the hunter always knows only by its tracks. The very fact that we can't describe it adequately now, searching as we are with various metaphors and similes, shows what a powerful thing it is, what attraction it has”. And yet another paradox emerges: the hunter not only destroys the prey, but also himself (www.litteraeslovenicae.si).
    Show book
  • I Could Pee on This Too - And More Poems by More Cats - cover

    I Could Pee on This Too - And...

    Francesco Marciuliano

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    There's a new cat in town! This feisty sibling of the international bestseller I Could Pee on This will be making its own sensational mark in the cat-poetry world. I Could Pee on This, Too explores fresh feline emotions and philosophical musings through cats' own poetry, such as "Welcome New Cat," "Sleeping My Life Away," and "You Also Live Here." Any cat lover who's longed for a deeper look into the enigmatic world of their cats will fall whiskers over paws for this well-versed follow-up.
    Show book
  • Endgame and Act Without Words - cover

    Endgame and Act Without Words

    Samuel Beckett

    • 0
    • 5
    • 0
    Samuel Beckett was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1969; his literary output of plays, novels, stories and poetry has earned him an uncontested place as one of the greatest writers of our time. Endgame, originally written in French and translated into English by Beckett himself, is considered by many critics to be his greatest single work. A pinnacle of Beckett’s characteristic raw minimalism, it is a pure and devastating distillation of the human essence in the face of approaching death.
    Show book