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Susanna Mother of Columbus - cover

Susanna Mother of Columbus

Maxwell John T.

Publisher: Chef Maxwell

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Summary

A fictionalized account of the life of Susanna Fontanarossa, the mother of Christopher Columbus. Susanna, born in the town of Gorretto in the mountains north of Genoa, Italy, moves with her father to Quezzi, a town east of Genoa where her father works as a Master Weaver. She meets and marries Dominic Columbus. The family to the city where Christopher is born. This is a story of a strong woman trying to survive in a world where women have little power. She resists the constraints of her religion, her marriage, and her time eventually leaving Genoa, her husband, and her normal life to join her two sons, Christopher and Bartholomew in Lisbon where the borders of the known world are exploding in the era of exploration.

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