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Our Eternity - Exploring the Mysteries of Eternity and Life - cover

Our Eternity - Exploring the Mysteries of Eternity and Life

Maurice Maeterlinck

Translator Alexander Teixeira de Mattos

Publisher: Good Press

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Summary

Maurice Maeterlinck's 'Our Eternity' is a thought-provoking exploration of the concept of eternity and its impact on human existence. Written in Maeterlinck's signature poetic prose style, the book delves into profound philosophical questions about the nature of time, life, and death. Maeterlinck's unique blend of symbolism and mysticism creates an ethereal atmosphere that invites readers to ponder the mysteries of existence. Set against the backdrop of late 19th-century European literature, 'Our Eternity' stands out as a timeless meditation on the human experience. Maurice Maeterlinck, a Belgian playwright and essayist, was known for his avant-garde literary style and existential themes. Influenced by the Symbolist movement, Maeterlinck's interest in metaphysics and spirituality is evident in 'Our Eternity'. His background in law and philosophy informs his exploration of complex philosophical ideas in a accessible and poetic manner, making his work both intellectually stimulating and emotionally resonant. I recommend 'Our Eternity' to readers interested in delving into profound philosophical reflections on life, time, and eternity. Maeterlinck's evocative writing style and deep insights into the human condition make this book a captivating read for those seeking to contemplate the mysteries of existence.
Available since: 10/25/2023.
Print length: 89 pages.

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