Don't put off till tomorrow the book you can read today!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Read online the first chapters of this book!
All characters reduced
1918 - Winning the War Losing the War - cover

1918 - Winning the War Losing the War

Matthias Strohn

Publisher: Osprey Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

In 2018, the world will be commemorating the centenary of the end of the First World War. In many ways, 1918 was the most dramatic year of the conflict. After the defeat of Russia in 1917, the Germans were able to concentrate their forces on the Western Front for the first time in the war, and the German offensives launched from March 1918 onward brought the Western Allies close to defeat. Having stopped the German offensives, the Entente started its counter-attacks on all fronts with the assistance of fresh US troops, driving the Germans back and, by November 1918, the Central Powers had been defeated.  
 
This new study is a multi-author work containing ten chapters by some of the best historians of the First World War from around the world writing today. It provides an overview and analysis of the different levels of war for each of the main armies involved within the changing context of the reality of warfare in 1918. It also looks in detail at the war at sea and in the air, and considers the aftermath and legacy of the First World War.

Other books that might interest you

  • That Was When People Started to Worry - Windows into Unwell Minds - cover

    That Was When People Started to...

    Nancy Tucker

    • 0
    • 4
    • 0
    'This is mental illness. It is unexpected strength and unusual luck and an uninterrupted string of steps. Then the next wave comes. And while you wipe grit from your eyes and swipe blood from your knees, the smiling faces in the distance call out: Why do you keep falling over?! Just stand up!'
    
    
    Conversations about mental health are increasing, but we still seldom hear what it's really like to suffer from mental illness.
    
    
    Enter Nancy Tucker, author of the acclaimed eating disorder memoir, The Time In Between. Based on her interviews with young women aged 16–25, That Was When People Started to Worry weaves together experiences of mental illness into moving narratives, humorous anecdotes, and guidance as to how we can all be more empathetic towards those who suffer. Tucker offers an authentic impression of seven common mental illnesses: depression, anxiety, bipolar disorder, self-harm, disordered eating, PTSD and borderline personality disorder. 
    
    
    
    Giving a voice to those who often find it hard to speak themselves, Tucker presents a unique window into the day-to-day trials of living with an unwell mind. She pushes readers to reflect on how we think, talk about and treat mental illness in young women.
    Show book
  • Rooster - The Life and Times of the Real Rooster Cogburn the Man Who Inspired True Grit - cover

    Rooster - The Life and Times of...

    Brett Cogburn

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “Fans of frontier arcana will revel” in this biography of the Arkansas cowboy, outlaw, and immortal Wild West frontiersman (Publishers Weekly).   Celebrated in Charles Portis’s classic novel and three hit films, the real “Rooster” Cogburn was as bold, brash, and bigger-than-life as the American West itself. Now, in this page-turning account, Cogburn’s great-great-grandson reveals the truth behind the fiction—and the man behind the myth . . . He was born in 1866 in Fancy Hill, Arkansas, the descendant of pioneers and moonshiners. Six foot three, dark eyed, and a dead shot with a rifle, Franklin “Rooster” Cogburn was as hard as the rocky mountain ground his family settled. The only authority the Cogburn clan recognized was God and a gun. And though he never packed a badge, Rooster meted out his own justice—taking on a posse of US deputy marshals in a blazing showdown. Now a wanted man, with a $500 reward on his head, Rooster—proud, stubborn, fearless, and ornery to the bitter end—rode into legend. In Rooster, “[Brett Cogburn]  . . . amazes and astounds us with the true-life story” of a genuine American icon, and unforgettable man of the West (Booklist). “The author has done extensive research to bring the times and his ancestor to life. It’s an interesting read, especially for history buffs. His descriptions of the Fort Smith area, Indian Territory and southeastern Oklahoma are outstanding.” —The Oklahoman   “In this book, [Cogburn] has blended family lore and good research to produce an entertaining portrait.” —The Dallas Morning News
    Show book
  • SS-Leibstandarte - The History of the First SS Division 1933–45 - cover

    SS-Leibstandarte - The History...

    Rupert Butler

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    ‘I swear to thee, Adolf Hitler, as Führer and Chancellor of the German Reich, loyalty and bravery. I vow to thee, and to the superiors whom thou shalt appoint, obedience unto death, so help me God.’ 
    – SS Oath of Loyalty   The divisions of the Waffen-SS were the elite of Hitler’s armies in World War II. SS-Leibstandarte is an in-depth examination of the first Waffen-SS unit to be formed, the SS-Leibstandarte Adolf Hitler. The book explores the background of the unit’s formation, including its origins as the Führer’s bodyguard, the men it recruited, the key figures involved in the division, its organization, training, uniforms and insignia. 
    SS-Leibstandarte also provides a full combat record of the division, which fought on both fronts during World War II. The book outlines the unit’s involvement in the fall of France, its service on the Eastern Front, the desperate attempts to throw the Allies out of Normandy after D-Day, and the final, fruitless attempts to relieve Budapest and save Vienna from the Red Army. 
    Illustrated with rare photographs and written by an acknowledged expert, SS-Leibstandarte is a definitive history of one of Nazi Germany’s most effective fighting units of World War II.
    Show book
  • Survivors of Stalingrad - cover

    Survivors of Stalingrad

    Reinhold Busch

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    In November 1942 - in a devastating counter-attack from outside the city - Soviet forces smashed the German siege and encircled Stalingrad, trapping some 290,000 soldiers of the 6th Army inside. For almost three months, during the harshest part of the Russian winter, the German troops endured atrocious conditions. Freezing cold and reliant on dwindling food supplies from Luftwaffe air drops, thousands died from starvation, frostbite or infection if not from the fighting itself. **This important work reconstructs the grim fate of the 6th Army in full for the first time by examining the little-known story of the field hospitals and central dressing stations. The author has trawled through hundreds of previously unpublished reports, interviews, diaries and newspaper accounts to reveal the experiences of soldiers of all ranks, from simple soldiers to generals. **The book includes first-hand accounts of soldiers who were wounded or fell ill and were flown out of the encirclement; as well as those who fought to the bitter end and were taken prisoner by the Soviets. They reflect on the severity of the fighting, and reveal the slowly ebbing hopes for survival. Together they provide an illuminating and tragic portrait of the appalling events at Stalingrad.
    Show book
  • Story of the British and Their Weather - cover

    Story of the British and Their...

    Patrick Nobbs

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The British weather. Subject of endless complaint, small-talk saviour of the British public, famously changeable. We all feel we know it well, as a largely benign and gentle backdrop to our lives. But how well do we really know it? The real story of British weather is in its history. The truth is, our weather has changed not only the course of our history and society dramatically, but even humanity itself. The extraordinary tale of Britain's weather and our relationship with it across the ages is told in this book. Recounting the greatest weather stories from the distant to the most recent past, it reveals a surprisingly frightening picture. Recent history alone includes a devastating tidal surge in 1953 that killed thousands around the North Sea coasts; bitter winter weather in 1947 and 1962/63 paralysed Britain economically, as did the dramatic water shortages caused by the 1975-76 drought. Whole communities have been wiped out in hours by devastating floods, while tornadoes, blizzards, gales, lightning and smog have all repeatedly caused death on a wide scale, even in the heart of London. And just as Icelandic volcanoes have shown more recently how ash can disrupt modern aircraft, so too have volcanoes influenced our weather catastrophically in the past, at one time sinking Napoleonic guns and shaping European politics, and at another almost ending humanity in its infancy. Well researched and divided up by weather type, this is a compelling read that clearly shows who is the real master of these islands and the ultimate controller of their destiny.
    Show book
  • Sapiens - A Brief History of Humankind - cover

    Sapiens - A Brief History of...

    Yuval Noah Harari

    • 18
    • 566
    • 0
    New York Times Bestseller 
    A Summer Reading Pick for President Barack Obama, Bill Gates, and Mark Zuckerberg  
    From a renowned historian comes a groundbreaking narrative of humanity’s creation and evolution—a #1 international bestseller—that explores the ways in which biology and history have defined us and enhanced our understanding of what it means to be “human.” 
    One hundred thousand years ago, at least six different species of humans inhabited Earth. Yet today there is only one—homo sapiens. What happened to the others? And what may happen to us? 
    Most books about the history of humanity pursue either a historical or a biological approach, but Dr. Yuval Noah Harari breaks the mold with this highly original book that begins about 70,000 years ago with the appearance of modern cognition. From examining the role evolving humans have played in the global ecosystem to charting the rise of empires, Sapiens integrates history and science to reconsider accepted narratives, connect past developments with contemporary concerns, and examine specific events within the context of larger ideas. 
    Dr. Harari also compels us to look ahead, because over the last few decades humans have begun to bend laws of natural selection that have governed life for the past four billion years. We are acquiring the ability to design not only the world around us, but also ourselves. Where is this leading us, and what do we want to become? 
    Featuring 27 photographs, 6 maps, and 25 illustrations/diagrams, this provocative and insightful work is sure to spark debate and is essential reading for aficionados of Jared Diamond, James Gleick, Matt Ridley, Robert Wright, and Sharon Moalem.
    Show book