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Confessions of an Investigative Reporter - cover

Confessions of an Investigative Reporter

Matthew Schwartz

Publisher: Koehler Books

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Summary

"A fascinating look behind the media mirror that reflects celebrity and power ... incredible." —Bob Dotson, New York Times bestselling author, former national correspondent, the Today show 
Award-winning investigative reporter Matthew Schwartz was ordered to lie on TV in the name of sensationalism. He was arrested for trespassing on the property of a business he exposed for committing fraud. A target of one of his investigations swung a baseball bat at his head. He’s been shoved, sued, and cursed out. He caught a car dealership rolling back odometers and selling used cars as new. In Confessions of an Investigative Reporter, this veteran journalist reveals his inner thoughts and the inside stories viewers never saw. Confessions of an Investigative Reporter is funny, fast-moving, and dishy. It provides a rare look inside the world of local news from someone who spent four decades in it. It’s not only for news viewers. It’s for anyone who cares about justice and their community. And about that time he was ordered to lie? His answers lie within.

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