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Bright Bursts of Colour - cover

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Bright Bursts of Colour

Matt Goodfellow

Publisher: Bloomsbury Education

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Summary

A brilliant, prize-winning collection of poems by Matt Goodfellow which is funny, engaging and touching in turns.  
 
What if cats had flavoured fur or if you swallowed the sun? What if you were a special kind of badger or if you found a map to the stars? And what if your home was split during the week: one half at Mum's, the other half at Dad's? 
 
'Those who love poetry should snap up Matt Goodfellow's rich and vivid new collection...' (The Guardian) 
 
'Matt Goodfellow is a fresh voice on the children's poetry scene.' (Pie Corbett) 
 
Packed with brilliant poems that explore a whole range of themes from the downright silly to the sensitive, this collection will delight, enthuse and resonate with children and adults alike. Winner of the 2020 North Somerset Teachers' Book Award for best children's poetry book 
 
Book Band: Brown 
Ideal for ages 7+
Available since: 02/05/2021.
Print length: 112 pages.

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