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Forest - cover

Forest

Matt Collins

Publisher: Chronicle Books LLC

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Summary

Brimming with engaging writing and stirring photography, Forest is an ode to the natural world and a celebration of the relationship between humans and trees.Discover the secrets hidden within the Earth's lush woodlands and wild landscapes through photographs and stories about enchanting forests, magnificent trees, and people who live off the land.Journeying across North America, the United Kingdom, and Europe, writer Matt Collins and photographer Roo Lewis capture the history, science, and human stories behind some of the most enchanting natural environments in the world. • Explores the captivating history behind some of the world's most enchanting forests• Organized by tree species, including the hearty pines in Spain's Tamada forest, the towering firs of the American West, the striking Birch groves of Germany's Elbe Valley, and beyond• A blend of beautiful photographs, scientific trivia, and engaging human storiesForest is an arresting tribute to the magnificence of the natural world and a wonderful gift for anyone who enjoys spending time in the outdoors.Complete with gorgeous photography and engaging stories of people living in harmony with nature, readers will learn everything they dream of knowing about the forests of the world. • A handsome gift for photographers, travel and outdoor enthusiasts, environmentalists, and science lovers• A stunning way to learn about the world and the trees that surround us• Great for readers who couldn't get enough of The Hidden Life of Trees by Peter Wohlleben, Ancient Trees by Beth Moon, and Wise Trees by Diane Cook and Len Jenshel

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