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Smarter Government - How to Govern for Results in the Information Age - cover

Smarter Government - How to Govern for Results in the Information Age

Martin O'Malley

Publisher: Esri Press

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Summary

This is the new way of governing.
 
The time has come for the rise of the tech savvy executive: an individual who innately understands the need to help the use of technology rise at the same level across the entire organization. In Baltimore and in Maryland, Governor Martin O’Malley has done all of these things and more.
 
Smarter Government: Governing for Results in the Information Age is about a more effective way to lead that is emerging, enabled by the Information Age. It provides real solutions to real problems using GIS technology and helps develop a management strategy using data that will profoundly change an organization.
 
Browse galleries, exercises, and resources supporting this book's ideas and concepts: https://www.smartergovernment.com

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