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Strength and Conditioning for Cyclists - Off the Bike Conditioning for Performance and Life - cover

Strength and Conditioning for Cyclists - Off the Bike Conditioning for Performance and Life

Martin Evans, Phil Burt

Publisher: Bloomsbury Sport

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Summary

Phil Burt and Martin Evans have worked with the world's best cyclists, including the Great Britain Cycling Team, devising and implementing highly effective off the bike training plans. Now, in Strength and Conditioning for Cyclists you can benefit from their wealth of knowledge and experience and apply it to make you a stronger, faster and more robust cyclist. 
 
Use the self-assessment, inspired by the Functional Movement Screening used by the Great Britain Cycling Team, to identify your strengths and weaknesses. 
 
Discover the mobility and strengthening movements that are most applicable to your needs, maximising effectiveness and avoiding wasted time. 
 
Learn how to devise your own personalised and progressive off the bike training plan, how to schedule it into your year and combine it most effectively with your cycling.

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