Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
The Bird-Catcher - cover

The Bird-Catcher

Martin Armstrong

Publisher: Bloomsbury Reader

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

This beautiful collection of poems tells tales of blossoming springs and fruitful summers; in Honey Harvest Armstrong depicts Spring with the overweight apple blossom nodding on their branches and the sweet honey filling our shelves, and in Spanish Vintage we are almost able to taste the plump purple grapes of August as we follow their journey through the seasons, maturing in the dark bodegas ready to be sipped when the time is just right.  This nature-inspired collection of poems was first published in 1929.

Who read this book also read:

  • Shibari - cover

    Shibari

    Gary Duggan

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    I’ve started to recognise complete strangers…
    An ad sales team leader on a joyride to self-destruction. A Romanian bookshop employee who wants to try something new. An entertainment journalist who wants out. A restaurant manager who mourns a suicide. An English movie star who seeks credibility by slumming it in theatre. A Japanese florist who feels it’s time to take another chance.
    Relationships are strained, snapped and formed in this modern-day look at life in a multi-cultural Dublin.
    Show book
  • The Revisionist - cover

    The Revisionist

    Jesse Eisenberg

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Revisionist, the second play by the award-winning actor and regular New Yorker contributor Jesse Eisenberg, is a stunning exploration of obsession, secrets, and the nature of family. The play had its world premiere at the Cherry Lane Theatre in New York in spring 2013, starring Jesse Eisenberg and Vanessa Redgrave and directed by Kip Fagan.In The Revisionist, young writer David arrives in Poland with a crippling case of writer’s block and a desire to be left alone. His seventy-five-year-old second cousin Maria welcomes him with a fervent need to connect with her distant American family. As their relationship develops, she reveals details about her postwar past that test their ideas of what it means to be a family.
    Show book
  • Muswell Hill - cover

    Muswell Hill

    Torben Betts

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    One night in January 2010 and an earthquake in Haiti leaves around a hundred thousand people dead and almost two million homeless. Meanwhile, somewhere in a leafy North London suburb, a group of six individuals convene over avocado and prawns, followed by a monkfish stew. They struggle with worries over their mortgages, their mobile phone tariffs, their Facebook friends, their careers, their love lives, their diets, their alcohol intake, their holiday plans and whether or not any of them will be able to make any lasting impression on history.‘Torben Betts is one of the most exciting theatre writing talents I have come across in many a year’ - Alan Ayckbourn ‘Betts has a profound and highly original theatrical voice’ - Daily Telegraph ‘Just about the most original and extraordinary writer of drama we have...a boldly visionary poet... a political Beckett... a flamingly original writer we ignore at our peril.' - Liz Lochhead,National Poet Of Scotland ‘What starts out as a mildly amusing comedy of social dysfunctionality turns into something altogether darker and less comfortable’ – The Stage‘A fantastic new play… accurate and witty writing… This stunning and moving play presented the drama and tragedy of everyday middle class life in a simple but believable style… an absolute triumph’ 5 stars – The Public Reviews
    Show book
  • You can’t bury them all - cover

    You can’t bury them all

    Patrick Woodcock

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Patrick Woodcock has spent the past seven years engaging with and being shaped by the people, politics, and landscapes of the Kurdish north of Iraq, Fort Good Hope in the Northwest Territories, and Azerbaijan. His powerful new collection offers a poetry that simultaneously explores hope and horror while documenting the transformative processes of coping. You can’t bury them all follows the narratives we construct to survive the tragic failures of our humanity to their very end: everything that’s buried by snow, dirt, and ash, just like everything that’s buried by politics, homophobia, sexism, racism, religion, and history is resurrected, demanding to be heard and addressed.
     
    In Woodcock’s poetry, how we deal with what resurfaces is the key. What do those who suffer really mean to those who have abandoned them to small, conscience-soothing charitable donations or the occasional tweet? How can the poet, or anyone else, sleep at night knowing homosexuals are being thrown off building tops, after one steps into a hole and finds an abandoned corpse in an Azeri cemetery, or after the elders of an Aboriginal community are left helpless against those who only want to exploit them? Still, You can’t bury them all demonstrates that the world is not just the horrific place the media often portrays. In each of the worlds he touches, Woodcock discovers a spirit and strength to celebrate.
    Show book
  • Don’t Let It End Like This Tell Them I Said Something - cover

    Don’t Let It End Like This Tell...

    Paul Vermeersch

    • 0
    • 2
    • 0
    Don’t Let It End Like This Tell Them I Said Something — Paul Vermeersch’s fifth collection of poetry — is, as its title suggests, a lyrical meditation on written language and the end of civilization. It combines centos, glosas, erasures, text collage, and other forms to imagine a post-apocalyptic literature built, or rebuilt, from the rubble of the texts that came before.
    Show book
  • The Anatomy of Clay - cover

    The Anatomy of Clay

    Gillian Sze

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Taking off from the myth of human creation, this poetic collection explores the individual as a sentient mystery. The first section examines overlooked moments with urban characters — the woman on the bus, a neighbor talking to plants, or the girl smoking after a storm. The second section takes a confessional turn towards the author's inner life. At times reflective, instructional, playful, or strange, exception is found in the ineffable distinctions between people, selves, objects, and histories.
    Show book