Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
The Bird-Catcher - cover

The Bird-Catcher

Martin Armstrong

Publisher: Bloomsbury Reader

  • 0
  • 1
  • 0

Summary

This beautiful collection of poems tells tales of blossoming springs and fruitful summers; in Honey Harvest Armstrong depicts Spring with the overweight apple blossom nodding on their branches and the sweet honey filling our shelves, and in Spanish Vintage we are almost able to taste the plump purple grapes of August as we follow their journey through the seasons, maturing in the dark bodegas ready to be sipped when the time is just right. 
 
This nature-inspired collection of poems was first published in 1929.

Who read this book also read:

  • Unquiet Things - Poems - cover

    Unquiet Things - Poems

    James Davis May

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Sorry, we have no synopsis for this book right now. Sign in to read it on 24symbols.com
    Show book
  • The Best Australian Poems 2016 - cover

    The Best Australian Poems 2016

    Sarah Holland-Batt

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    ‘Above all, poetry – for both its readers and its writers – is a form that demands attentiveness and active intelligence. It treats language as a volatile and charged commodity, and one whose subtleties and nuances are worth puzzling over.’ —Sarah Holland-Batt
    
    Award-winning poet, critic, editor and academic Sarah Holland-Batt takes the helm as editor of this year’s Best Australian Poems. Demonstrating the diversity, inventive brilliance and dynamism of our country’s finest poets, this collection features work from both rising stars and well-known figures, and presents a dazzling array of themes and styles. Whether addressing biotechnology or domestic violence, migrant experience or the natural world, the poems in this anthology are sure to inspire, provoke and move.
    
    Poets include Martin Harrison, Judith Beveridge, Clive James, Keven Brophy, Joanne Burns, Les Murray, Pam Brown, Eileen Chong, Luke Davies, Laurie Duggan, Geoff Page, Ali Cobby Eckermann, Toby Fitch, Robert Gray, Lisa Gorton, Natalie Harkin, John Kinsella, Felicity Plunkett, Chris Wallace-Crabbe, Billy Marshall Stoneking, Cate Kennedy, David Malouf, Julie Chevalier, Lionel G. Fogarty and many more…
    
    Sarah Holland-Batt is the author of The Hazards (UQP, 2015) and Aria (UQP, 2008), which won the Thomas Shapcott Poetry Prize, the Arts ACT Judith Wright Award, and the FAW Anne Elder Award and was shortlisted in both the New South Wales and Queensland Premiers’ Literary Awards. She is presently a Senior Lecturer in Creative Writing at the Queensland University of Technology and the poetry editor of Island.
    Show book
  • Yellow Face (TCG Edition) - cover

    Yellow Face (TCG Edition)

    David Henry Hwang

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    “A pungent play of ideas with a big heart. Yellow Face brings to the national discussion about race a sense of humor a mile wide, an even-handed treatment and a hopeful, healing vision of a world that could be.”—Variety 
    “Charming, touching, and cunningly organized as well as funny, [with] an Ibsenite reach and stature far beyond any issues of Hwang’s self-image.”—The Village Voice 
    “It’s about our country, about public image, about face,” says David Henry Hwang about his latest work, a mock documentary that puts Hwang himself center stage as it explores both Asian identity as well as race in America. The play begins with the 1990s controversy over color-blind casting for Miss Saigon, before it spins into a comic fantasy, in which the character DHH pens a play in protest and then unwittingly casts a white actor as the Asian lead. Yellow Face also explores the real-life investigation of Hwang’s father, the first Asian American to own a federally chartered bank, and the espionage charges against physicist Wen Ho Lee. Adroitly combining the light touch of comedy with weighty political and emotional issues, “Hwang’s lively and provocative cultural self-portrait lets nobody off the hook” (The New York Times). 
    David Henry Hwang is the author of the Tony Award–winning M. Butterfly, a finalist for the 1988 Pulitzer Prize. Other plays include Golden Child, FOB, The Dance and the Railroad, and Family Devotions; his opera libretti include three works for composer Philip Glass. He was appointed by President Clinton to the President’s Committee on the Arts and Humanities.
    Show book
  • Encounter in April - Poems - cover

    Encounter in April - Poems

    May Sarton

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The debut work of a literary legend May Sarton’s career spanned sixty years and included novels, poetry, memoirs, and even children’s books, but it was poetry that provided the world’s first look at her wondrous talent. Encounter in April is a fitting starting point for readers wishing to familiarize themselves with one of the twentieth century’s most lyrical and eloquent authors.   In this anthology, Sarton describes womanhood devastatingly and unforgettably, deftly matching serene imagery with powerful emotion. Her sonnets are to be savored. Encounter in April is a thesis statement for a lengthy and profound career, and Sarton’s talent is readily evident from the beginning.
    Show book
  • Figure Studies - Poems - cover

    Figure Studies - Poems

    Claudia Emerson

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Poet Claudia Emerson begins  Figure Studies with a twenty-five-poem lyric sequence called "All Girls School," offering intricate views of a richly imagined boarding school for girls. Whether focused on a lesson, a teacher, or the girls themselves as they collectively "school" -- or refuse to -- the poems explore ways girls are "trained" in the broadest sense of the word."Gossips," the second section, is a shorter sequence narrated by women as they talk about other women in a variety of isolations; these poems, told from the outside looking in, highlight a speculative voicing of all the gossips cannot know. In "Early Lessons," the third section, children narrate as they also observe similarly solitary women, the children's innocence allowing them to see in farther than the gossips can. The fourth section offers studies of women and men in situations in which gender, with all of its complexities, figures powerfully.The follow-up to the Pulitzer Prize-winning collection  Late Wife,  Figure Studies upholds Emerson's place among contemporary poetry's elite.The Mannequin above Main Street MotorsWhen the only ladies' dress shop closed, she was left on the street for trash, unsalvageable, one arm missing, lost at the shoulder, one leg at the hip. But she was wearing a blue-sequined negligee and blonde wig, so they helped themselves to her on a lark -- drunken impulse -- and for years kept her leaning in a corner, beside an attic window, rendered invisible. The dusk was also perpetual in the garage below,punctuated only by bare bulbs hung close over the engines. An oily grime coated the walls, and a decade of calendars promoted stock-car drivers, women in dated swimsuits, even their bodies out of fashion. Radio distorted there; cigarette smoke moaned, the pedal steel conceding to that place a greater, echoing sorrow. So, lame, forgotten prank, she remained,back turned forever to the dark storagebehind her, gaze leveled just above anyone's who could have looked up to mistake in the cast of her face fresh longing -- her expression still reluctant figure for it.
    Show book
  • Ruined (TCG Edition) - cover

    Ruined (TCG Edition)

    Lynn Nottage

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Winner of the 2009 Pulitzer Prize for Drama 
    “A powerhouse drama. . . . Lynn Nottage’s beautiful, hideous and unpretentiously important play [is] a shattering, intimate journey into faraway news reports.”—Linda Winer, Newsday 
    “An intense and gripping new drama . . . the kind of new play we desperately need: well-informed and unafraid of the world’s brutalities. Nottage is one of our finest playwrights, a smart, empathetic and daring storyteller who tells a story an audience won’t expect.”—David Cote, Time Out New York 
    A rain forest bar and brothel in the brutally war-torn Congo is the setting for Lynn Nottage’s extraordinary new play. The establishment’s shrewd matriarch, Mama Nadi, keeps peace between customers from both sides of the civil war, as government soldiers and rebel forces alike choose from her inventory of women, many already “ruined” by rape and torture when they were pressed into prostitution. Inspired by interviews she conducted in Africa with Congo refugees, Nottage has crafted an engrossing and uncommonly human story with humor and song served alongside its postcolonial and feminist politics in the rich theatrical tradition of Bertolt Brecht’s Mother Courage. 
    Lynn Nottage’s plays include Crumbs from the Table of Joy, Fabulation, and Intimate Apparel, winner of the American Theatre Critics’ Steinberg New Play Award and the Francesca Primus Prize. Her plays have been widely produced, with Intimate Apparel receiving more productions than any other play in America during the 2005-2006 season.
    Show book