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The Survivors of the Chancellor - cover

The Survivors of the Chancellor

Mark Twain

Translator Lewis Page Mercier

Publisher: WS

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Summary

The Survivors of the Chancellor: Diary of J. R. Kazallon, Passenger is an 1875 novel written by Jules Verne about the final voyage of a British sailing ship, the Chancellor, told from the perspective of one of its passengers (in the form of a diary).

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