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The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn (Omnibus Edition) (Diversion Illustrated Classics) - cover

The Adventures of Tom Sawyer and Huckleberry Finn (Omnibus Edition) (Diversion Illustrated Classics)

Mark Twain

Publisher: Diversion Books

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Summary

Introducing Diversion Classics, an illustrated series that showcases great works of literature from the world's most beloved authors.
Two beloved tales of growing up on the Mississippi, from one of America’s most celebrated writers. THE ADVENTURES OF TOM SAWYER and its sequel, THE ADVENTURES OF HUCKLEBERRY FINN, follow two boys on dangerous adventures and journeys of self-discovery. Twain’s sharp satire and observations on race make this classic duo a necessity for modern readers.

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