Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
North & South (Civil War Boxed Set) - 40+ Novels Stories & History Books in One Volume - cover

North & South (Civil War Boxed Set) - 40+ Novels Stories & History Books in One Volume

Mark Twain, Edward Everett Hale, Ambrose Bierce, Joseph A. Altsheler, John Esten Cooke, John William De Forest, Randall Parrish, Charles King, G. A. Henty, Robert W. Chambers, Winston Churchill, George Washington Cable, George W. Peck, Ellen Glasgow, Natalie Sumner Lincoln, John McElroy, Byron A. Dunn, John R. Musick, James Ford Rhodes, Jules Verne, Thomas Dixon Jr., B. K. Benson, Charles Carleton Coffin, Lucy Foster Madison, W. H. Shelton, Harry Hazelton, Edward Robins, Henry F. Keenan, María Ruiz de Burton

Publisher: e-artnow

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

e-artnow presents to you this unique collection of the carefully picked out Civil War novels and stories:
History of the Civil War, 1861-1865 (James Ford Rhodes)
The Red Badge of Courage (Stephen Crane)
The Little Regiment (Stephen Crane)
The Veteran (Stephen Crane)
An Occurrence at Owl Creek Bridge (Ambrose Bierce)
A Horseman in the Sky (Ambrose Bierce)
Chickamauga (Ambrose Bierce)
The Private History of a Campaign That Failed (Mark Twain)
A Curious Experience (Mark Twain)
The Guns of Bull Run (Joseph A. Altsheler)
The Guns of Shiloh (Joseph A. Altsheler)
The Scouts of Stonewall (Joseph A. Altsheler)
The Sword of Antietam (Joseph A. Altsheler)
The Star of Gettysburg (Joseph A. Altsheler)
The Rock of Chickamauga (Joseph A. Altsheler)
The Shades of the Wilderness (Joseph A. Altsheler)
The Tree of Appomattox (Joseph A. Altsheler)
The Crisis (Winston Churchill)
Miss Ravenel's Conversion from Secession to Loyalty (John William De Forest)
With Lee in Virginia (G. A. Henty)
Who Would Have Thought It? (María Ruiz de Burton)
The Long Roll (Mary Johnston)
Cease Firing (Mary Johnston)
The Victim: A Romance of the Real Jefferson Davis (Thomas Dixon Jr.)
Kincaid's Battery (George Washington Cable)
The Border Spy (Harry Hazelton)
The Battle Ground (Ellen Glasgow)
Who Goes There? (B. K. Benson)
Ailsa Paige (Robert W. Chambers)
Special Messenger (Robert W. Chambers)
How Private George W. Peck Put Down the Rebellion (George W. Peck)
Raiding with Morgan (Byron A. Dunn)
Mohun; Or, the Last Days of Lee and His Paladins (John Esten Cooke)
Brother Against Brother (John R. Musick)
The Last Three Soldiers (W. H. Shelton)
A War-Time Wooing (Charles King)
The Iron Game (Henry F. Keenan)
The Blockade Runners (Jules Verne)
The Lost Despatch (Natalie Sumner Lincoln)
My Lady of the North (Randall Parrish)
Uncle Daniel's Story of "Tom" Anderson (John McElroy)
The Red Acorn (John McElroy)
Winning His Way (Charles Carleton Coffin)
A Daughter of the Union (Lucy Foster Madison)
Chasing an Iron Horse (Edward Robins)
The Man Without a Country (Edward Everett Hale)
Available since: 02/04/2021.
Print length: 9581 pages.

Other books that might interest you

  • Play It Right - The Remarkable Story of a Gambler Who Beat the Odds on Wall Street - cover

    Play It Right - The Remarkable...

    Kamal Gupta

    • 0
    • 4
    • 1
    A real-life underdog tale of one man turning the tables on the casinos and Wall Street without selling his soul to the devil
    		 
    All around the world, the words “Wall Street” conjure up a powerful image. For some, it is the center of America’s capitalist system and the engine of its economic growth. For others, it is the home of rapacious bankers and reckless traders whose greed would lead to a global financial crisis. For an Indian-born blackjack player, Wall Street represented something else entirely — a chance for him to play in the largest casino in the world.
    		 
    Kamal Gupta’s improbable journey, from a wide-eyed Indian immigrant to an ultimate insider in the rarefied world of investment banks and hedge funds, is a uniquely American story. Nowhere else would it have been possible for a scrawny computer scientist to enter the world of high finance solely on the basis of his gambling abilities. After spending seven years creating an investment methodology, Gupta went on an incredible run, generating an unprecedented 103 consecutive months of positive returns while managing money at large hedge funds. His success did not go unnoticed, and he found himself under constant pressure to take bigger risks to make even more money. He refused and always played it right, knowing that there was such a thing as “enough” money, something very few, if any, of his Wall Street peers understood.
    		 
    Much like Maria Konnikova’s bestseller, The Biggest Bluff, Play It Right isn’t so much about money as it is about the human condition and beating the odds, whether at a casino, on Wall Street, or in life itself.
    Show book
  • The Poems and Prose Poems of Charles Baudelaire - cover

    The Poems and Prose Poems of...

    Charles Baudelaire

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    The Poems and Prose Poems of Charles Baudelaire
    About the Book Books about American Poetry present the poetry written by American poets, who first gained world prominence during the 19th century, and have presented a distinctly American world view.
    Charles Baudelaire, in full Charles-Pierre Baudelaire, (born April 9, 1821, Paris, France—died August 31, 1867, Paris), French poet, translator, and literary and art critic whose reputation rests primarily on Les Fleurs du mal (1857; The Flowers of Evil), which was perhaps the most important and influential poetry collection published in Europe in the 19th century. Similarly, his Petits poèmes en prose (1868; “Little Prose Poems”) was the most successful and innovative early experiment in prose poetry of the time.
    Baudelaire was the only child of François Baudelaire and his much younger second wife, Caroline Defayis, whom he married in 1819. Having begun his career as a priest, François had abandoned holy orders in 1793 and ultimately became a prosperous middle-ranking civil servant. A painter and poet of modest talent, he introduced his son to art, or what the younger Baudelaire would later call his greatest, most consuming, and earliest of passions, “the cult of images.” His father died in February 1827, and for some 18 months thereafter Baudelaire and his mother lived together on the outskirts of Paris in conditions that he would always remember, writing to her in 1861 of that “period of passionate love” for her when “I was forever alive in you; you were solely and completely mine.” This “verdant paradise of childhood loves” abruptly ended in November 1828 when Caroline married Jacques Aupick, a career soldier who rose to the rank of general and who later served as French ambassador to the Ottoman Empire and Spain before becoming a senator under the Second Empire.
    In 1831 Aupick was posted to Lyons, and Baudelaire began his education at the Collège Royal there in 1832 before transferring, on the family’s return to Paris in 1836, to the prestigious Lycée Louis-le-Grand. Baudelaire showed promise as a student and began to write his earliest poems, but to his masters he seemed an example of precocious depravity, adopting what they called “affectations unsuited to his age.” He also developed a tendency to moods of intense melancholy, and he became aware that he was solitary by nature. Regular acts of indiscipline led to his being expelled from the school after a trivial incident in April 1839. After passing his baccalauréat examinations while enrolled at the Collège Saint-Louis, Baudelaire became a nominal student of law at the École de Droit while in reality leading a “free life” in the Latin Quarter. There he made his first contacts in the literary world and also contracted the venereal disease that would eventually kill him, probably from a prostitute nicknamed Sarah la Louchette (“Squint-Eyed Sarah”), whom he celebrated in some of his most affecting early poems.
    In an attempt to wean his stepson from such disreputable company, Aupick sent him on a protracted voyage to India in June 1841, but Baudelaire effectively jumped ship in Mauritius and, after a few weeks there and in Réunion, returned to France in February 1842. The voyage had deepened and enriched his imagination, however, and his brief encounter with the tropics would endow his writing with an abundance of exotic images and sensations and an everlasting theme of nostalgic reverie.
    Show book