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Is Shakspeare Dead - cover

Is Shakspeare Dead

Mark Twain

Publisher: anamsaleem

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Summary

The humorist takes on the controversy over the authorship of Shakespeare's plays in this 1909 essay, one of the last published in his lifetime. Twain argues that the man from Stratford could not have written the plays, because he lacked the education and was not famous in his home town, as Twain was in Hannibal, Missouri.
Available since: 12/06/2018.

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