Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court - cover

We are sorry! The publisher (or author) gave us the instruction to take down this book from our catalog. But please don't worry, you still have more than 1 million other books you can enjoy!

A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court

Mark Twain

Publisher: Open Road Media

  • 0
  • 2
  • 0

Summary

Mark Twain’s classic satirical tale of time travel and Arthurian legend Hank Morgan is a supervisor at a firearms factory in Hartford, Connecticut. Following a violent argument with a man named Hercules, Hank is surprised to find himself under an oak tree, staring up at a man on horseback in full armor. The year is 528, and Hank has somehow landed in King Arthur’s Court in Camelot. Worse still, Hank is ridiculed by the boorish knights, brought in front of the Round Table, and sentenced to burn at the stake. Will Hank die at the hands of the Knights of the Round Table, or can his Yankee ingenuity save his hide?   Mark Twain’s seminal satire sends up the South’s ridiculous preoccupation with chivalry, the Catholic Church, fear of science and progress, and dozens of other behaviors and beliefs. Credited as a foundational work of the time travel subgenre of science fiction, A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur’s Court is also a timeless comic classic.   This ebook has been professionally proofread to ensure accuracy and readability on all devices.

Other books that might interest you

  • The Three Apples - From the Arabian Nights - cover

    The Three Apples - From the...

    Anonymous Anonymous

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    "The Three Apples" is a story contained in the One Thousand and One Nights collection (also known as the Arabian Nights). Scheherazade tells the history of a murder — making this the first mystery story put to paper.
    Show book
  • If - Classic Tales Edition - cover

    If - Classic Tales Edition

    Rudyard Kipling

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The beloved poem from the great Rudyard Kipling. If you can follow these precepts, you will indeed be a man, my son.
    Show book
  • Fathers and Sons - cover

    Fathers and Sons

    Ivan Turgenev

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The fathers and children of the novel refers to the growing divide between the two generations of Russians, and the character Yevgeny Bazarov has been referred to as the "first Bolshevik", for his nihilism and rejection of the old order. 
    Turgenev wrote Fathers and Sons as a response to the growing cultural schism that he saw between liberals of the 1830s/1840s and the growing nihilist movement. Both the nihilists (the "sons") and the 1830s liberals sought Western-based social change in Russia. Additionally, these two modes of thought were contrasted with the conservative Slavophiles, who believed that Russia's path lay in its traditional spirituality. 
    Fathers and Sons might be regarded as the first wholly modern novel in Russian Literature (Gogol's Dead Souls, another main contender, is sometimes referred to as a poem or epic in prose as in the style of Dante's Divine Comedy). The novel introduces a dual character study, as seen with the gradual breakdown of Bazarov's and Arkady's nihilistic opposition to emotional display, especially in the case of Bazarov's love for Madame Odintsova and Fenichka. This prominent theme of character duality and deep psychological insight would exert an influence on most of the great Russian novels to come, most obviously echoed in the novels of Tolstoy and Dostoevsky. 
    The novel is also the first Russian work to gain prominence in the Western world, eventually gaining the approval of well established novelists Gustave Flaubert, Guy de Maupassant, and Henry James, proving that Russian literature owes much to Ivan Turgenev. (Summary from Wikipedia)
    Show book
  • Ordeal of Elizabeth - cover

    Ordeal of Elizabeth

    Anonymous Anonymous

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    An unforgettable family saga which revolves around the beautiful young Elizabeth. Elizabeth is orphaned and raised by her spinster aunts. As an adult, she finds herself trapped in a loveless marriage and ultimately falls in love with another man. After telling her lover the truth about her marriage - her husband is found murdered the very next day! This is a story of destiny, temptation, and courage of the heart. (Summary by Lani Small) This book is sometimes attributed to Elizabeth von Arnim, but her authorship cannot be confirmed. There is no chapter four in this book, it seems to have been intentionally left out by the author.
    Show book
  • Decline and Fall - cover

    Decline and Fall

    Evelyn Waugh

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Sent down from Oxford after a wild, drunken party, Paul Pennyfeather is oddly surprised to find himself qualifying for the position of schoolmaster at a boys' private school in Wales. His colleagues are an assortment of misfits, rascals and fools, including Prendy (plagued by doubts) and Captain Grimes, who is always in the soup (or just plain drunk). Then Sports Day arrives, and with it the delectable Margot Beste-Chetwynde, floating on a scented breeze. As the farce unfolds in Evelyn Waugh's dazzling debut as a novelist, the young run riot and no one is safe, least of all Paul.
    Show book
  • The Dust that was Barren - cover

    The Dust that was Barren

    P.C. Wren

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Percival Christopher Wren (1875 - 1941) was an English writer of adventure fiction mostly dealing with colonial soldiering in Africa. He is remembered best for Beau Geste, a much filmed book of 1924, involving the French Foreign Legion in North Africa.'The Dust That Was Barren' is a strange tale of a peculiar incident in the French Foreign Legion. Commandant Le Sage comes across a legionnaire who has fallen behind his comrades and has laid himself down in the sand, saying he is dying. But when the Commandant's back is turned, the legionnaire attempts to shoot him in the head. He misses, and Le Sage whips out his pistol and shoots the treacherous man dead.Shortly after this, a tombstone appears on the spot on which is written: On this spot on the 1st of December 19-- Le Légionnaire Barren was murdered by Captain Le Sage.Outraged at the lie, the General orders the stone removed and destroyed. But before long a replica stone is erected. This too is removed...and a third, fourth, fifth, sixth and seventh stone appear to replace the destroyed one. Nobody knows where the stones come from, who makes them and why they say what they do. And then, one day, the solution to the mystery is explained... and it is a very peculiar tale indeed.
    Show book