Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Lio: Making Friends - cover

Lio: Making Friends

Mark Tatulli

Publisher: Andrews McMeel Publishing

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

A curious young scientist and comic book fan, Lio is the defender of the defenseless and the inventor of a legion of zombie bunnies. Lio is joined in his day-to-day exploits by his exasperated and sleep-deprived father, a pet snake named Frank, a squid named Ishmael, and various imaginary robots and creepy, crawly monsters. Within this humorously macabre framework of sarcasm, parody, and high jinks, sidesplitting laughter abounds—all without so much as a word.

Other books that might interest you

  • Johann Gutenberg and the Printing Press - cover

    Johann Gutenberg and the...

    Kay Olson

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Tells the story of Johann Gutenberg and the invention of the printing press. Written in graphic-novel format.
    Show book
  • A Flying Ace Needs Lots of Root Beer - cover

    A Flying Ace Needs Lots of Root...

    Charles Schulz

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Snoopy, The World War I Flying Ace, finds refuge from the war in a little French café (a.k.a. Marcie’s house). A bemused Marcie lets Snoopy take over her house—until he drinks all her root beer and makes a mess with the empty mugs. Can Marcie get Snoopy to go back to Charlie Brown and his doghouse, and can the World War I Flying Ace evade the Red Baron? 
    Charles Schulz’ Peanuts comic strip charmed and delighted millions of fans—both kids and adults—for more than 40 years. In November 2015, a new 3D Peanuts movie will be released—the first in 35 years. 
    Just in time for the new movie, this new ebook edition introduces the memorable Peanuts gang—Snoopy, Lucy, Linus, Peppermint Patty, Sally, Marcie, Schroder, Woodstock, and Charlie Brown—to a whole new generation of readers.
    Show book
  • Introducing Literary Criticism - A Graphic Guide - cover

    Introducing Literary Criticism -...

    Owen Holland

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    From Plato to Virginia Woolf, Structuralism to Practical Criticism, Introducing Literary Criticism charts the history and development of literary criticism into a rich and complex discipline.
     
    Tackling disputes over the value and meaning of literature, and exploring theoretical and practical approaches, this unique illustrated guide will help readers of all levels to get more out of their reading.
    Show book
  • It's a Stupid Game; It'll Never Amount to Anything - The Golf Cartoons of Joseph Farris - cover

    It's a Stupid Game; It'll Never...

    Joseph Farris

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    In his illustrious career as a cartoonist for the New Yorker and other publications, Joseph Farris has created dozens of hilarious cartoons about “the best game in the world at which to be bad.”A.A. Milne had it right, and Farris’s cartoons get to the heart of the game’s wonderful contradiction: over the course of eighteen holes, golf has the capacity to bring great joy and drive you crazy.Farris treats us to the sight of a blissfully happily newlywed with “Just Married” emblazoned on the back of his golf cart; of an archaeologist who discovers a hieroglyph featuring an annoyed-looking pharaoh breaking a golf club over his knee; and a TV-watching husband who rebuffs his naked wife’s amorous advances in no uncertain terms: “Not now, I’m watching Tiger Woods.”It’s been said that real golfers don’t cry.  That may or may not be true.   Joseph Farris’s cartoons are sure to make any golfer laugh.
    Show book
  • It's Not Funny If I Have to Explain It - A Dilbert Treasury - cover

    It's Not Funny If I Have to...

    Scott Adams

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Office workers, cubicle squatters, and corporate drones everywhere read Dilbert in their morning papers and see their own bosses and coworkers in the frames of the strip, enacting on newsprint the weird rituals and bizarre activities that are conducted each day in the American workplace. The characters' names and hairstyles have been changed to protect their identities, but Dilbert's readers aren't fooled. After all, they spend every day with these idiots and lunatics.
     
    Jargon-spewing corporate zombies. The sociopath who checks voice mail on his speaker phone. The fascist information systems guy. The sadistic human resources director. The technophobic vice president. The power-mad executive assistant. The pursed-lip sycophant. The big stubborn dumb guy. They're Dilbert's coworkers, and chances are they're yours, too. If you know them, work with them, or dialogue with them about leveraging synergies to maximize shareholder value, then you'll recognize this comic strip as a day at the office, only funnier!
     
    Since 1989 Dilbert has lampooned not only the people but also the accepted conventions and practices of the business world. Office politics, management trends, business travel, personnel policies, corporate bureaucracy, irrational strategies, unfathomable accounting practices, unproductive meetings, dysfunctional organizations, oppressive work spaces, silly protocols, and inscrutable jargon are all targets of Adams's darkly goofy satirical pen. Dilbert strikes a deeply resonant chord with fans because it casts such a dead-on reflection of the realities of the white-collar workplace, even with its off-the-wall delivery.
     
    It's Not Funny If I Have to Explain It, features Adams's personal all-time favorite selections, along with his own handwritten commentary about the strips. 
    Show book
  • Julius Caesar - cover

    Julius Caesar

    William Shakespeare

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Retold in graphic-novel format, the epic tale of Julius Caesar’s rule over Rome. Brutus and Cassius, friends and supporters of Julius Caesar, brood and worry over his increasing ambitions. Caesar’s pursuit of power leads the two men to worry that Caesar will crown himself Emperor, which would ruin Rome’s Republic of the people. Behind closed doors, Cassius and Brutus begin to concoct a scheme that will irrevocably alter the fate of the Roman empire.
    Show book