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Talking to Crazy - How to Deal with the Irrational and Impossible People in Your Life - cover

Talking to Crazy - How to Deal with the Irrational and Impossible People in Your Life

Mark Goulston

Publisher: AMACOM

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Summary

“Finally! The book that helps you deal with irrational, impossible people.” —Oprah’s Book Club 2.0 
Let’s face it, we all know people who are irrational. No matter how hard you try to reason with them, it never works. So what’s the solution? How do you talk to someone who’s out of control? What can you do with a boss who bullies, a spouse who yells, or a friend who frequently bursts into tears? 
In his book, Just Listen, Mark Goulston shared his bestselling formula for getting through to the resistant people in your life. Now, in his breakthrough new book Talking to Crazy, he brings his communication magic to the most difficult group of all—the downright irrational. 
As a psychiatrist, Goulston has seen his share of crazy and he knows from experience that you can’t simply argue it away. The key to handling irrational people is to learn to lean into the crazy—to empathize with it. That radically changes the dynamic and transforms you from a threat into an ally. Talking to Crazy explains this counterintuitive Sanity Cycle and reveals: 
Why people act the way they doHow instinctive responses can exacerbate the situation—and what to do insteadWhen to confront a problem and when to walk awayHow to use a range of proven techniques including Time Travel, the Fish-bowl, and the Belly RollAnd much more 
You can’t reason with unreasonable people—but you can reach them. This powerful and practical book shows you how.

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