Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Run Like Duck - cover

Run Like Duck

Mark Atkinson

Publisher: Sandstone Press

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

A guide to running for the unathletic, told by a man who fell into the sport almost by accident. Progressing cautiously on a reluctant and unexpected journey to 100 Marathons (and beyond), he learned the hard way from years of getting it wrong. Unlikely to break any records or become a national figure for the standards he sets, he nonetheless has enhanced his life and fitness, taking his long-suffering family along with him. In this witty account, he writes about his unsteady progress while knocking the stuffing out of running pomposity.

Other books that might interest you

  • Victory 365 - Daily Motivation for a Champion's Heart - cover

    Victory 365 - Daily Motivation...

    Athletes Fellowship of Christian

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    365-Day Devotional Encourages Athletes and Coaches to Take a Time-Out to Center on Their Relationship with GodEven as they strive for victory on the field or on the court, athletes and coaches can make strides toward richer spiritual lives. Growing in faith helps athletes and coaches grow as positive influences on the teammates, coaches, opponents, and parents around them. This 365-day devotional encourages athletes and coaches to take a time-out to rethink and re-center on their faith. Each entry opens with an inspirational thought and a related Scripture. A reflection question at the end of each entry helps the reader apply the lesson to his or her life as both a believer and a participant in the competitive arena.
    Show book
  • Beautiful Game Theory - How Soccer Can Help Economics - cover

    Beautiful Game Theory - How...

    Ignacio Palacios-Huerta

    • 1
    • 1
    • 0
    The first book to use the world's most popular sport to test economic theories and document novel human behaviorA wealth of research in recent decades has seen the economic approach to human behavior extended over many areas previously considered to belong to sociology, political science, law, and other fields. Research has also shown that economics can provide insight into many aspects of sports, including soccer. Beautiful Game Theory is the first book that uses soccer to test economic theories and document novel human behavior.In this brilliant and entertaining book, Ignacio Palacios-Huerta illuminates economics through the world's most popular sport. He offers unique and often startling insights into game theory and microeconomics, covering topics such as mixed strategies, discrimination, incentives, and human preferences. He also looks at finance, experimental economics, behavioral economics, and neuroeconomics. Soccer provides rich data sets and environments that shed light on universal economic principles in interesting and useful ways.Essential reading for students, researchers, and sports enthusiasts, Beautiful Game Theory is the first book to show what soccer can do for economics.
    Show book
  • The 100-Yard War - Inside the 100-Year-Old Michigan-Ohio State Football Rivalry - cover

    The 100-Yard War - Inside the...

    Greg Emmanuel

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    “A rough-and-tumble pop-culture look at the history of this storied game.”--National Review OnlineThe 100-Yard War showcases two great football teams who want nothing more than to beat each other, celebrating their storied history and going behind the scenes with the players and the fans to reveal the bitterness, the passion, and the pride surrounding the Game. ESPN called it the number one sports rivalry of the century. It transcends the years, the standings, and all other distractions. And thanks to the countless remarkable football games between Michigan and Ohio State--and hundreds of thousands of devoted alumni and followers--the rivalry is now an enormous cultural event.
    Show book
  • A Place on the Team - The Triumph and Tragedy of Title IX - cover

    A Place on the Team - The...

    Welch Suggs

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A Place on the Team is the inside story of how Title IX revolutionized American sports. The federal law guaranteeing women's rights in education, Title IX opened gymnasiums and playing fields to millions of young women previously locked out. Journalist Welch Suggs chronicles both the law's successes and failures-the exciting opportunities for women as well as the commercial and recruiting pressures of modern-day athletics. 
      Enlivened with tales from Suggs's reportage, the book clears up the muddle of interpretation and opinion surrounding Title IX. It provides not only a lucid description of how courts and colleges have read (and misread) the law, but also compelling portraits of the people who made women's sports a vibrant feature of American life. 
      What's more, the book provides the first history of the law's evolution since its passage in 1972. Suggs details thirty years of struggles for equal rights on the playing field. Schools dragged their feet, offering token efforts for women and girls, until the courts made it clear that women had to be treated on par with men. Those decisions set the stage for some of the most celebrated moments in sports, such as the Women's World Cup in soccer and the Women's Final Four in NCAA basketball. 
      Title IX is not without its critics. Wrestlers and other male athletes say colleges have cut their teams to comply with the law, and Suggs tells their stories as well. 
      With the chronicles of Pat Summitt, Anson Dorrance, and others who shaped women's sports, A Place on the Team is a must-read not only for sports buffs but also for parents of every young woman who enters the arena of competitive sports.
    Show book
  • Pitino - My Story - cover

    Pitino - My Story

    Rick Pitino

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    On September 26, 2017, the biggest recruiting scandal in college basketball history sent shock waves through the world of sports. Caught up in a massive FBI and NCAA investigation—and the intense media spotlight—was Rick Pitino, the Louisville Cardinals’ Hall of Fame coach. Here, from Pitino himself, comes the real story of the  ongoing  case  and the hard truth about how college hoops has been pushed to the brink of disaster by greed, bad actors, and shoe company money. Rick Pitino has spent a lifetime in basketball. He is the recruiting and coaching maestro behind Final Four appearances with three different teams, and National Championships at two of them. He worked the early days of the legendary Five-Star camp and scouted players without the influence of agents, runners, or shoe companies. And he has run today’s recruiting gauntlet of sports apparel marketing, corrupted assistant coaches, unethical youth coaches, and powerful organizations hellbent against him. Rick Pitino has seen it all, dealt with it all, and now tells it all. Pitino is the story of an epic coaching career and the evolution of NCAA basketball to the multi-billion-dollar enterprise it is today. It is also a master’s course on the arts of coaching and recruiting. And in the telling, the one and only Rick  Pitino lays all his cards on the table in addressing scandals of his past and the  current headline-grabbing investigation that led a packed Board of Directors at Louisville to derail his career.
    Show book
  • Color Blind - The Forgotten Team That Broke Baseball's Color Line - cover

    Color Blind - The Forgotten Team...

    Tom Dunkel

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A 2013 CASEY Award Finalist for Best Baseball Book of the YearWhen baseball swept America in the years after the Civil War, independent, semipro, and municipal leagues sprouted up everywhere. With civic pride on the line, rivalries were fierce and teams often signed ringers to play alongside the town dentist, insurance salesman, and teen prodigy. In drought-stricken Bismarck, North Dakota during the Great Depression, one of the most improbable teams in the history of baseball was assembled by one of the sport’s most unlikely champions. A decade before Jackie Robinson broke into the Major Leagues, car dealer Neil Churchill signed the best players he could find, regardless of race, and fielded an integrated squad that took on all comers in spectacular fashion.Color Blind immerses the reader in the wild and wonderful world of early independent baseball, with its tough competition and its novelty. Dunkel traces the rise of the Bismarck squad, focusing on the 1935 season and the first National Semipro Tournament. This is an entertaining, must-read for anyone interested in the history of baseball.“A tale as fantastic as it is true.”—Boston Globe
    Show book