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Wild Women - cover

Wild Women

Mariella Frostrup

Publisher: Anima

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Summary

From Constantinople to Crimea, from Antarctica to the Andes, women throughout history have travelled across land and sea and recorded their adventures. This is a collection of more than 50 of the greatest escapades ever experienced and told by women. 
 
Curated by Mariella Frostrup, these works span the globe from the 1700s to the present day and include well-known heroines such as Isabella Bird, Dervla Murphy and Cheryl Straid as well as unknown and undiscovered adventurers.

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