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Good in a Crisis - A Memoir of Divorce Dating and Other Near-Death Experiences - cover

Good in a Crisis - A Memoir of Divorce Dating and Other Near-Death Experiences

Margaret Overton

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

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Summary

During the four years of physician Margaret Overton's acrimonious divorce, she dated widely and indiscriminately, determined to find her soul mate and live happily ever after. But then she discovered she had a brain aneurysm. She discovered it at a particularly awkward moment on a date with one of many Mr. Wrongs.Good in a Crisis is Overton's laugh-out-loud funny story of dealing with the most serious of life's problems: loss of life, loss of love, loss of innocence. It's about spirituality, self-delusion, even sheer stupidity. It's written from a physician's perspective, but it's not about medicine, per se; it's about coming of age in adulthood, an effort to help others through the awful events that can cluster in midlife. She does this with laughter and the recognition that you may come out the other end, as Overton did, definitely humbled... and only slightly smarter.

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