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Road to Success: The Classic Guide for Prosperity and Happiness - cover

Road to Success: The Classic Guide for Prosperity and Happiness

Marcus Aurelius, Napoleon Hill, Authors Various, Benjamin Franklin, Sun Tzu, Lao Tzu, Wallace D. Wattles, Florence Scovel Shinn, Joseph Murphy, James Allen

Publisher: Oregan Publishing

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Summary

The road to your success is not a highway. You have to create it as you go.

This collection of 10 classic self-help books was built for people willing to achieve the incredible journey of life with a certain dose of success.

CONTENTS:

1. Benjamin Franklin - The Way to Wealth
2. Florence Scovel Shinn - The Game of Life and How to Play It
3. James Allen - As A Man Thinketh
4. James Allen - From Poverty to Power
5. Joseph Murphy - The Power of your Subconscious Mind
6. Lao Tzu - Tao Te Ching
7. Marcus Aurelius - Meditations
8. Napoleon Hill - Think and Grow Rich
9. Sun Tzu - The Art of War
10. Wallace D. Wattles - The Science of Getting Rich

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