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Team-CARE together we win - cover

Team-CARE together we win

Marco Laganà

Publisher: Youcanprint

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Summary

This manual is for:
Anyone working in a team, who wants to make it work.
Anyone struggling in a team but who wants to make a contribution and give meaning to their daily work routine: particularly the leaders and the coaches, but also those working in human resources.
Anyone who believes that a team's human capital is worth much more than the sum of the individuals in it (and their 'cost') - as long as the team functions well.
How do we make the team function well? We have to care about it, and take care of it.
People are not talents per se, but every person has talents, skills they can utilise to help others. It is up to us to discover, to inspire, to give them the right role and enhance their place in the team, because together we win.
If you have a problem at work, you do not need to change the individuals in the team. You need to change the way you see, engage, manage and value them.
If you have weaknesses, you can try to work on them but sometimes it is better to leverage on others' strengths and work together.
If you are a striker, instead of being forced to play as a goalkeeper, you should play with a goalkeeper!

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