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Within a Budding Grove - cover

Within a Budding Grove

Marcel Proust

Publisher: Open Road Media

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Summary

In the second volume of the acclaimed novel, the narrator recalls his adolescent discoveries of art and women in Belle Époque France.Following the events of Swann’s Way, the nameless narrator shifts his attention to memories of his teenage years. His relationship with the Swann family is altered as his love for Gilberte fizzles out. Two years later, he accompanies his grandmother to the resort town of Balbec on the Normandy coast. There, he encounters figures who will change his life: Robert de Saint-Loup, who becomes his friend; the magnificent painter Elstir; and the new object of his affection, the beautiful Albertine, who causes him to reflect on the nature of love.Although it was originally meant to be published in 1914, Within a BuddingGrove’s release was delayed until 1919 due to World War I. The book was awarded the Prix Goncourt, which quickly garnered fame for Proust. It is the second of seven volumes in a saga Edmund White hailed as “the most respected novel of the twentieth century.”Praise for Marcel Proust“Reading Proust . . . it’s a whole world not just a book. Everyone wants to live more than one life and Proust is like ‘here’s another one you can live.’” —Francine Prose, New York Times–bestselling author of Mister Monkey“I can think of only one other writer capable of such breadth and humanity: Shakespeare.” —André Aciman, New York Times–bestselling author of Find Me “When I want to restore my faith in literature, I read Proust. . . . Reading Proust is like watching a galaxy being put together, one particle at a time.” —Aleksandar Hemon, author of The Making of Zombie Wars

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