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The Patient Griselda Myth - Looking at Late Medieval and Early Modern European Literature - cover

The Patient Griselda Myth - Looking at Late Medieval and Early Modern European Literature

Madeline Rüegg

Publisher: De Gruyter

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Summary

From the 14th until the 19th century the last novella of Boccaccio’s Decameron, also known as the Griselda story, has been translated and adapted countless times in many European languages. This story’s success can be explained by considering it a myth and analysing how this myth engages with contemporary discourses, such as the definition of the ideal wife, the querelle des femmes, the socio-political consequences of social exogamy, and tyranny.

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