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The Unmasking - A Novel - cover

The Unmasking - A Novel

Lynn C. Miller

Publisher: University of New Mexico Press

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Summary

Best friends Bettina, Miriam, and Fiona are shocked when their dean of liberal studies dies in a single-car accident amid accusations of mishandling university funds. They suspect murder, especially after learning that the dean’s estranged wife will inherit three million dollars. Events take a surprising turn when they travel from Austin, Texas, to a Chautauqua performance in Silver City, New Mexico, where they join several others, some with questionable motives, including the dean’s wife and her lover. In the close confines of the lodge, the group brings to life remarkable women from history—including Victoria Woodhull, Gertrude Stein, Edith Wharton, Mabel Dodge Luhan, and Virginia Woolf. But when one woman is kidnapped and another disappears, the friends’ lives are forever changed as they realize that the masks we wear often hide chilling truths.

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