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Tears in the Grass - cover

Tears in the Grass

Lynda A. Archer

Publisher: Dundurn

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Summary

An elderly Cree artist, joined by her daughter and granddaughter, searches for the child taken from her almost eighty years ago after she was raped in a residential school
Looks at natural issues of ecosystem destruction and extinction alongside the human trauma of the residential school system
Explores the 1960s fractured relationship between Native and non-Native people
A poetic novel filled with the history and stark uniqueness of the spacious, quietly beautiful Saskatchewan landscape
Author is well connected in the Native community in B.C., though not Native herself

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