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Run Sis - cover

Run Sis

Lunden Reid

Publisher: L.M. Reid

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Summary

Take a journey with me through some of the most trying times of my life. See what it's like to deal with an abusive relationship, depression, anxiety, and post traumatic stress disorder through the eyes of someone that dealt with it first hand. Run Sis is nothing short of a heartfelt letter to to all victims of abuse, and people that deal with extreme anxiety.  My story isn't one you haven't heard before, but it's relayed in such a way that will not only make you laugh, bring tears to your eyes, hope to your heart, and a lift to your spirit. I ran, and if this is you I hope my book gives you the courage to run too sis.

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