Add this book to bookshelf
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey 902feb64d8b6d481ab8ddda06fbebbba4c95dfa9b7936a7beeb197266cd8b846
Spinner ae25b23ec1304e55286f349b58b08b50e88aad5748913a7eb729246ffefa31c9
A Supremely Bad Idea - Three Mad Birders and Their Quest to See It All - cover

A Supremely Bad Idea - Three Mad Birders and Their Quest to See It All

Luke Dempsey

Publisher: Bloomsbury USA

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

It began with a weekend house; then weekend trips. Then the occasional meeting rearranged in favor of a morning in Central Park, just while the spring migration was on. Before Luke Dempsey knew it, he had spiraled down into full-on birding mania - finding himself riding along with two like-minded maniacs in a series of disreputable rental cars and even nastier motel rooms, charging madly around the country in search of its rarest and most beautiful birds.  
A Supremely Bad Idea is the story of that search, and those birds, and those maniacs, and that country, and (to a much lesser extent) those rental cars. In Texas, the three obsessives go in search of the deeply endangered Golden-cheeked Warbler, which lives on the side of a hill near a waterfall; in Michigan, they see the pretty-much-extinct Kirtland's Warbler, which insists on short pine trees for nesting and lots of "quiet, please"; in Arizona, they see the very private Elegant Trogon after a very public fight with a birding guide. Along the way, Dempsey narrates an amazing sequence of encounters with nature and humanity, including a man building a 40-foot ark in his Seattle backyard; a beautiful woman who shows him how to kill 4,000 Cowbirds a year; a coyote (and his human smuggler) on the Rio Grande; and everywhere, these incandescent birds flitting across the range of his binoculars, and his heart.  
With the casual erudition of a Bill Bryson and the comic timing of a British David Sedaris, Dempsey demonstrates why so many millions of birders care so much about birds - and why, perhaps, the rest of us should, too.

Who read this book also read:

  • The Fall of UBS - The Forces That Brought Down Switzerland’s Biggest Bank - cover

    The Fall of UBS - The Forces...

    Dirk Schutz

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Essential reading for business and finance professionals: a complicated story of power, ambition, vanity and a lack of risk management controls at one of Europe’s largest banks.
    Show book
  • This Explains Everything - 150 Deep Beautiful and Elegant Theories of How the World Works - cover

    This Explains Everything - 150...

    John Brockman

    • 1
    • 5
    • 0
    In This Explains Everything, John Brockman, founder and publisher of Edge.org, asked experts in numerous fields and disciplines to come up with their favorite explanations for everyday occurrences. Why do we recognize patterns? Is there such a thing as positive stress? Are we genetically programmed to be in conflict with each other? Those are just some of the 150 questions that the world's best scientific minds answer with elegant simplicity. 
    With contributions from Jared Diamond, Richard Dawkins, Nassim Taleb, Brian Eno, Steven Pinker, and more, everything is explained in fun, uncomplicated terms that make the most complex concepts easy to comprehend.
    Show book
  • Python - cover

    Python

    Arthur Keane

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Fellow aspiring programmer,  
     
    This is an easy-to-follow guide on how to learn Python for absolute beginners!  
     
    My name is Arthur and I have more than 10 years of experience programming in Python. I worked as a Senior Developer for Google and I now run my own Network Security Consulting Business in the heart of London.  
     
    Programming is my passion. My mission with this book is to make programming your passion too!  
     
    Why Python? I'll be quick and precise just like how Python is itself!  
     
    1. Python is an easy language to learn for first time programmers. Simple syntax. Easy to grasp.  
    2. It's the most marketable language at the moment. Want a high salary? Learn Python (Average salary for Python programmers - $110K/year).  
    3. Wanna work for startups? Python is the way! The reason is that it shortens the way from idea to implementation. Startups need to be fast and implement new ideas super fast.  
    4. Wanna get into web application development? Python again is the way.  
    5. Python is the ideal language for those who want to master computer security.  
    6. What's hot in Computer Science at the moment? Artificial Intelligence and Machine Learning! Correct! Check the job offers in the AI field and you'll see that Python is the dominant language! 
     
    Python is really popular. More importantly, it's getting more popular every year. Over the last year its popularity increased more than any other language's!  
     
    Get your hands on a straightforward guide that will walk you through step-by-step on how to master Python. 
     
    In this book you'll get all that you need. For example: 
     
    - Step-by-step Installation Guide 
    - Simple operations 
    - Python lingo - important terms 
    - Syntax tips 
    - Control Statements  
    - Loops 
    - Comparison statements 
    - GUI  
     
    I'll even show you how to build a GUI application! Not just command line statements but a proper GUI real application.  
     
    I'm happy that my mentor about 10 years ago shifted my attention to Python. Now it's my turn to shift your attention to the right path.  
     
    Happy Python folks!  
     
    Arthur
    Show book
  • The Evolution of Everything - How New Ideas Emerge - cover

    The Evolution of Everything -...

    Matt Ridley

    • 1
    • 4
    • 0
    The New York Times bestselling author of The Rational Optimist and Genome returns with a fascinating argument for evolution that definitively dispels a dangerous, widespread myth: that we can command and control our world. 
    Human society evolves. Change in technology, language, morality, and society is incremental, inexorable, gradual, and spontaneous. It follows a narrative, going from one stage to the next; it creeps rather than jumps; it has its own spontaneous momentum rather than being driven from outside; it has no goal or end in mind; and it largely happens by trial and error—a version of natural selection. Much of the human world is the result of human action but not of human design: it emerges from the interactions of millions, not from the plans of a few. 
    Drawing on fascinating evidence from science, economics, history, politics, and philosophy, Matt Ridley demolishes conventional assumptions that the great events and trends of our day are dictated by those on high, whether in government, business, academia, or organized religion. On the contrary, our most important achievements develop from the bottom up. Just as skeins of geese form Vs in the sky without meaning to and ter-mites build mud cathedrals without architects, so brains take shape without brain-makers, learning happens without teaching, and morality changes for no reason other than the prevailing fashion. Although we neglect, defy, and ignore them, bottom-up trends shape the world. The Industrial Revolution, cell phones, the rise of Asia, and the Internet were never planned; they happened. Languages emerged and evolved by a form of natural selection, as did common law. Torture, racism, slavery, and pedophilia—all once widely regarded as acceptable—are now seen as immoral despite the decline of religion in recent decades. In this wide-ranging and erudite book, Ridley brilliantly makes the case for evolution, rather than design, as the force that has shaped much of our culture, our technology, our minds, and that even now is shaping our future. 
    As compelling as it is controversial, as authoritative as it is ambitious, Ridley’s deeply thought-provoking book will change the way we think about the world and how it works.
    Show book
  • The End of Average - How We Succeed in a World That Values Sameness - cover

    The End of Average - How We...

    Todd Rose

    • 4
    • 14
    • 0
    Are you above average? Is your child an A student? Is your employee an introvert or an extrovert? Every day we are measured against the yardstick of averages, judged according to how closely we come to it or how far we deviate from it. 
    The assumption that metrics comparing us to an average—like GPAs, personality test results, and performance review ratings—reveal something meaningful about our potential is so ingrained in our consciousness that we don’t even question it. That assumption, says Harvard’s Todd Rose, is spectacularly—and scientifically—wrong. 
    In The End of Average, Rose, a rising star in the new field of the science of the individual shows that no one is average. Not you. Not your kids. Not your employees. This isn’t hollow sloganeering—it’s a mathematical fact with enormous practical consequences. But while we know people learn and develop in distinctive ways, these unique patterns of behaviors are lost in our schools and businesses which have been designed around the mythical “average person.” This average-size-fits-all model ignores our differences and fails at recognizing talent. It’s time to change it. 
    Weaving science, history, and his personal experiences as a high school dropout, Rose offers a powerful alternative to understanding individuals through averages: the three principles of individuality. The jaggedness principle (talent is always jagged), the context principle (traits are a myth), and the pathways principle (we all walk the road less traveled) help us understand our true uniqueness—and that of others—and how to take full advantage of individuality to gain an edge in life. 
    Read this powerful manifesto in the ranks of Drive, Quiet, and Mindset—and you won’t see averages or talent in the same way again.
    Show book
  • Quantum Mechanics - cover

    Quantum Mechanics

    Richard Fitzpatrick

    • 0
    • 1
    • 0
    Quantum mechanics was developed during the first few decades of the twentieth century via a series of inspired guesses made by various physicists, including Planck, Einstein, Bohr, Schroedinger, Heisenberg, Pauli, and Dirac. All these scientists were trying to construct a self-consistent theory of microscopic dynamics that was compatible with experimental observations. 
    The purpose of this book is to present quantum mechanics in a clear, concise, and systematic fashion, starting from the fundamental postulates, and developing the theory in as logical a manner as possible. Topics covered in the book include the fundamental postulates of quantum mechanics, angular momentum, time-independent and time-dependent perturbation theory, scattering theory, identical particles, and relativistic electron theory.     
    Request Inspection CopyContents:Fundamental ConceptsPosition and MomentumQuantum DynamicsOrbital Angular MomentumSpin Angular MomentumAddition of Angular MomentumTime-Independent Perturbation TheoryTime-Dependent Perturbation TheoryIdentical ParticlesScattering TheoryRelativistic Electron TheoryReadership: For graduate students and self-contained or independent study in the field of quantum mechanics.Key Features:A clear, concise, and systematic exposition of quantum mechanics at the graduate level makes it appear accessible to even advanced undergraduatesContains large number of exercises with solutions provided, making it an ideal text for self-contained or independent study
    Show book