Join us on a literary world trip!
Add this book to bookshelf
Grey
Write a new comment Default profile 50px
Grey
Subscribe to read the full book or read the first pages for free!
All characters reduced
Eight Cousins - Illustrated - cover

Eight Cousins - Illustrated

Louisa May Alcott

Publisher: BertaBooks

  • 0
  • 0
  • 0

Summary

Eight Cousins was published by Louisa May Alcott. It is the story of Rose Campbell, a lonely and sickly girl who has been recently orphaned and must now reside with her maiden great aunts, the matriarchs of her wealthy Boston family. When Rose's guardian, Uncle Alec, returns from abroad, he takes over her care.

Through his unorthodox theories about child-rearing, she becomes happier and healthier while finding her place in her family of seven boy cousins and numerous aunts and uncles. She also makes friends with Phebe, her aunts' young housemaid, whose cheerful attitude in the face of poverty helps Rose to understand and value her own good fortune.

Each chapter describes an adventure in Rose's life as she learns to help herself and others make good choices. Rose must define for herself her role as the only woman of her generation in her family and as an heiress in Boston's elite society.

Louisa May Alcott (1832-1888) was a prolific and multi-talented American writer. Amongst her works are passionate, fiery novels, moralistic and wholesome stories for children, philosophical essays and letters. Her overwhelming success however, was with Little Women: or Meg, Jo, Beth and Amy (1868), a semiautobiographical account of her childhood years with her three sisters in Concord, Massachusetts. Part Two, or Part Second, also known as Good Wives (1869) followed the March sisters into adulthood and their respective marriages. Little Men (1871) detailed the characters and ways of Alcott's nephews who lived with her at Orchard House in Concord, and Jo's Boys (1886) completed the "March Family Saga".
Available since: 08/02/2017.

Other books that might interest you

  • Book of Good Counsels - From the Sanskrit of the "Hitopadesa" - cover

    Book of Good Counsels - From the...

    Sir Edwin Arnold

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    The term ‘Hitopadesha’ is a combination of two Sanskrit terms, ‘Hita’ (welfare/ benefit) and ‘Upadesha’ (counsel). As the term suggests, The Hitopadesha is a collection of tales that gives good counsel. Hitopadesa was presumably written by Narayan Pandit and is an independent treatment of the Vishnu Sarman's Panchatantra (3rd century BC) which it resembles in form. In Hitopadesha, Vishnu Sarman is depicted as a Sage who undertakes to give good counsel to the sons of Sudarsana, the king of Pataliputra, through stories within stories involving talking animals. The dating of Hitopadesha is problematic as no other work by Narayan Pandit is known. The earliest manuscript of Hitopadesha dates from 1373; it could be of East Indian origin during the Pala Empire (8th-12th centuries).This book is a condensed but faithful transcript of Hitopadesha in sense and manner rendered in English by Sir Edwin Arnold. Sir Edwin says in the Preface that the Hitopadesa may be styled 'The father of all Fables'; for "from its numerous translations come Esop and Piplay and in latter days, 'Reineke Fuchs'." Summary by Jothi
    Show book
  • The Short Stories of Stacy Aumonier - cover

    The Short Stories of Stacy Aumonier

    Stacy Aumonier

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Stacy Aumonier was a British writer, best known for his outstanding short stories. Nobel prize winner, John Galsworthy described Aumonier as "one of the best short-story writers of all time" and predicted that he would "outlive all the writers of his day".Aumonier wrote over 85 short stories in his lifetime. He has been described as the "British Maupassant" owing to his captivating plots and his ability to create complex characters with just a few lines of carefully selected prose.His intensely visual prose meant his works were readily adaptable to the cinema screen, and several of his short stories were adapted by Alfred Hitchcock.•	Miss Bracegirdle does her Duty•	Old Iron•	Where was Wych Street?•	Old Fags•	A Source of Irritation•	The Brothers•	Juxtapositions
    Show book
  • Castle Warlock - cover

    Castle Warlock

    George MacDonald

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    A novel of a son’s worldly and spiritual inheritance set in the majestic Scottish Highlands—by the nineteenth-century British author of Mary Marston.   Thematically linked to Mary Marston which preceded it, MacDonald here poignantly depicts the father-son relationship as he had earlier that of father and daughter. MacDonald’s storytelling power again returns to the highlands of Scotland, setting his narrative in the hills south of Huntly. We encounter vivid descriptions of that wild terrain, including snowstorms, summer joys, harvests, along with MacDonald’s trademark mysteries, inheritances, treasures, and, of course, romance. Castle Warlock is one of the most thoroughly Scottish of MacDonald's novels, and is a favorite with many for its spiritual, relational, and natural splendor.   Castle Warlock is unique among MacDonald’s titles, being first published in America in 1881, six months in advance of its British counterpart of 1882. This new edition by MacDonald biographer Michael Phillips streamlines the occasionally ponderous Victorian narrative style and updates the thick Doric brogue into readable English.
    Show book
  • In Trouble - cover

    In Trouble

    Anton Chekhov

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    When several employees of the bank are arrested for corruption, the merchant Avdeyev doesn't give the ordeal much thought, figuring the men going to jail deserve it. His opinion changes however when he returns home to find his wife and son very upset -- his house had just been searched by officials in connection to the bank corruption. Avdeyev had signed papers for the bankers without knowing what they were and so had essentially signed his life away by his carelessness. During the following trial, he learns the danger of being a "sheep" and just following along without a mind of his own.
    Show book
  • A Long-Ago Affair - cover

    A Long-Ago Affair

    John Galsworthy

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    John Galsworthy (1867-1933) was an English playwright and novelist who was awarded the Nobel Prize for Literature in 1932.A Long-Ago Affair is a poignant story of requited love and betrayal. A 16-year-old boy with a torrid crush on an older married woman finds himself unwittingly facilitating her secret love affair with another man.
    Show book
  • The Vampire - cover

    The Vampire

    Jan Neruda

    • 0
    • 0
    • 0
    Jan Nepomuk Neruda (1834-1891) was born in Prague, Bohemia, the son of a small grocer. After studying philosophy and philology, he worked as a teacher until 1860, when he became a freelance journalist and writer.'The Vampire' is a strange tale of a group of tourists visiting an idyllic spot outside Constantinople in the company of a charming but oddly sinister Greek artist who seems to be at pains to ensure nobody can look over his shoulder and see what he is sketching.
    Show book