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Orientalism (A Selection Of Classic Orientalist Paintings And Writings) - cover

Orientalism (A Selection Of Classic Orientalist Paintings And Writings)

lord byron, Gustave Flaubert, William Beckford, Théophile Gautier, Pierre Benoit

Publisher: ShandonPress

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Summary

ShandonPress proudly presents the Orientalism compilation which regroups major orientalist works (both paintings and writings). Orientalism is a term used by scholars in art history, literary, geography, and cultural studies for the depiction of Eastern, that is "Oriental" cultures, including Middle Eastern, North African, South Asian and Southeast Asian cultures, done by writers, designers, and artists from the West. In particular, Orientalist painting depicting "the Middle East" was a genre of 19th-century Academic art. The literature of Western countries took a similar interest in Oriental themes.We hope you enjoy navigating through this ebook. We made sure to create active tables of contents in order to maximise your reading and viewing experience.CONTENTS:1. Paintings1.1 Harems1.1.A Jean-Jules-Antoine Lecomte du Nouÿ, The White Slave (1888)1.1.B Fernand Cormon, The Deposed Favourite (1872)1.1.C Jean-Léon Gérôme, Pool in a Harem (1876)1.1.D Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, Grande Odalisque (1814)1.1.E Jean Auguste Dominique Ingres, with the assistance of his pupil Paul Flandrin, Odalisque with Slave (1839)1.1.F Ferdinand Max Bredt, Turkish ladies (1893)1.1.G Giulio Rosati, Inspection of New Arrivals, Circassian beauties being inspected1.1.H John Frederick Lewis, The Reception (1873)1.1.I Jean-Auguste-Dominique Ingres, The Turkish Bath (1862)1.2 Landscapes And Other Paintings1.2.A Hermann Corrodi, A view of the tomb of the Caliphs with the pyramids of Giza beyond, Cairo1.2.B Eugène Fromentin, Arabs (1871)1.2.C Léon Belly, Pilgrims going to Mecca (1861)1.2.D Vasily Vereshchagin, They are triumphant (1872)1.2.E Anders Zorn, Man and boy in Algiers (1887)1.2.F John Frederick Lewis, The midday meal, Cairo1.2.G Giulio Rosati, The Discussion2. Writings2.1 Lord Byron - The Giaour (A Fragment Of A Turkish Tale)2.2 William Beckford - The History Of Caliph Vathek2.3 Pierre Benoit - Atlantida2.4 Gustave Flaubert - Salammbô2.5 Théophile Gautier - The Romance Of A Mummy

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