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Byron's Narrative of the Loss of the Wager - cover

Byron's Narrative of the Loss of the Wager

Lord Byron

Publisher: Charles River Editors

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Summary

Byron's Narrative of the Loss of the Wager is an account of the wreck and mutiny of the HMS Wager.  The Wager was a British ship which wrecked in 1741 off the coast of Chile.  A mutiny ensued and only a handful of the original 300 crew made it back to England.

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